The Chaplet of St. Michael the Archangel – Discerning Hearts Podcast

ArchangelsOL

Chaplet of St. Michael the Archangel text and mp3 download

O God, come to my assistance. O Lord, make haste to help me. Glory be to the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit.

Then one ‘Our Father’ and three ‘Hail Marys’ are to be prayed after each of the following nine salutations

1. By the intercession of St. Michael and the celestial Choir of Seraphim may the Lord make us worthy to burn with the fire of perfect charity. Amen.

2. By the intercession of St. Michael and the celestial Choir of Cherubim may the Lord grant us the grace to leave the ways of sin and run in the paths of Christian perfection. Amen.

3. By the intercession of St. Michael and the celestial Choir of Thrones may the Lord infuse into our hearts a true and sincere spirit of humility. Amen.

4. By the intercession of St. Michael and the celestial Choir of Dominions may the Lord give us grace to govern our senses and overcome any unruly passions. Amen.

5. By the intercession of St. Michael and the celestial Choir of Powers may the Lord protect our souls against the snares and temptations of the devil. Amen.

6. By the intercession of St. Michael and the celestial Choir of Virtues may the Lord preserve us from evil and falling into temptation. Amen.

7. By the intercession of St. Michael and the celestial Choir of Principalities may God fill our souls with a true spirit of obedience. Amen.

8. By the intercession of St. Michael and the celestial Choir of Archangels may the Lord give us perseverance in faith and in all good works in order that we may attain the glory of Heaven. Amen.

9. By the intercession of St. Michael and the celestial Choir of Angels may the Lord grant us to be protected by them in this mortal life and conducted in the life to come to Heaven. Amen.

Next, one Our Father is to be said in honour of each of the following leading Angels: St. Michael, St. Gabriel, St. Raphael and our Guardian Angel.

Concluding prayers

A Saint Michael rosary.O glorious prince St. Michael, chief and commander of the heavenly hosts, guardian of souls, vanquisher of rebel spirits, servant in the house of the Divine King and our admirable conductor, thou who dost shine with excellence and superhuman virtue deliver us from all evil, who turn to thee with confidence and enable us by your gracious protection to serve God more and more faithfully every day.

Pray for us, O glorious St. Michael, Prince of the Church of Jesus Christ, that we may be made worthy of His promises.

Almighty and Everlasting God, Who, by a prodigy of goodness and a merciful desire for the salvation of all men, has appointed the most glorious Archangel St. Michael Prince of Thy Church, make us worthy, we beseech Thee, to be delivered from all our enemies, that none of them may harass us at the hour of death, but that we may be conducted by him into the August Presence of Thy Divine Majesty. This we beg through the merits of Jesus Christ Our Lord.

Amen.

 


ArchangelMichael1-217x300Prayer to St. Michael

St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May GOD rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou o’ prince of the Heavenly Host, by the power of GOD cast into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl throughout the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.
A St. Michael Website

 

Gabriel-201x3001Prayer to the Archangel St. Gabriel

O God, who from among all your angels chose the Archangel Gabriel to announce the mystery of the Incarnation, mercifully grant that we who solemnly remember him on earth may feel the benefit of his patronage in heaven, with Jesus who lives and reigns for ever and ever. Amen.
A St. Gabriel Website

 

 

raphael11Prayer to the Archangel Raphael

Glorious Archangel St. Raphael, great prince of the heavenly court, your are illustrious for your gifts of wisdom and grace. You are a guide of those who journey by land or sea or air, consoler of the afflicted, and refuge of sinners. I beg you, assist me in all my needs and in all the sufferings of this life, as once you helped the young Tobias on his travels. Because you are the “medicine of God”, I humbly pray you to heal the many infirmities of my soul and the ills that afflict my body. I especially ask of you the favor
(name it) and the great grace of purity to prepare me to be the temple of the Holy Spirit. Amen.
A St. Raphael Website

HP6 – Prayer and Healing from Sin – The Heart of Prayer with Fr. Éamonn Bourke – Discerning Hearts Podcast

HP6 – Prayer and Healing from Sin – The Heart of Prayer with Fr. Éamonn Bourke

Fr. Éamonn Bourke and Kris McGregor explore the why, how, and what of “prayer”.  In this episode, they explore the healing power of prayer against sin and the role the Holy Spirit plays in it as well.

Here is an excerpt from their conversation:

Fr. Éamonn Bourke:

Speaker 1 Remember, Sin has damaged us. It’s damaged our beauty. It’s damaged the way we look at ourselves, the way we view the world, our relationships with each other, and God will never do any damage to us. That’s one thing to remember. So when He heals us, He heals us the most precious, beautiful and loving and gentle way, and slowly but surely reveals that dignity to us in a really profound way,. That’s why, I suppose for some, sins that are particularly invasive or addictive, that’s why we need to come to confession regularly,. Because God will never, as I said, force us to do anything, but He gently leading us and that the damage that is overcome is overcome sometimes gently, so it’s just never give up because “Oh, I went to confession and I did grand for a couple of days and then I fell into temptation again. I’m the worst person in the world.”

No, you just pick yourself back up with God’s grace. Allow God to pick you up and you go back to Him and you ask Him for his grace about that gentle, loving, merciful, healing will eventually, in your life, transform your life. God does not do any violence to us, but gently, lovingly restores our dignity back to its uniqueness.

Confession for me, as a priest, is just an incredible encounter with the merciful Jesus, and one of the examples or the results of a really good, decent confession from someone who really gives their heart to the Lord is often tears, and that freedom of being… Actually I was embarrassed by this and I had no reason to be, because I was encountering the merciful Jesus at a retreat recently for students that were discussing the apparition at Knock, County Mayo in Ireland of Our Lady in the 1850s, and one of the beautiful aspects of the apparition there, which has no words, is the lamb of God present on the altar as a delicate lamb. And I think, really, that’s who we approach in confession, so we’ve no need to be afraid or embarrassed by approaching a lamb, because we’ve got nothing to fear from the gentleness of a lamb, and so we should never be, “I’m too embarrassed, I’m too afraid, I’m too upset, too anxious.”

Never allow that to become a barrier, because we’re approaching the lamb of God who wants to take away the sins of the world, and not just the sins of the world, our sin as well.

Father Éamonn Bourke is a priest of the Archdiocese of Dublin, Ireland, and served as Vocations Director for the diocese, as well as Pastor in a number of its parishes. Trained as a spiritual director in the contemplative style, he now serves as Chaplain to University College, Dublin, the largest University in Ireland.

⇨For more episodes in the series visit: The Heart of Prayer with Fr. Éamonn Bourke – Discerning Hearts Podcasts

 

PSM1 – The River of Liturgy – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Dr. David Fagerberg

Episode 1 – The River of the Liturgy – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg Ph.D.

Dr. David Fagerberg and Kris McGregor begin this 16 episode series that explores various aspects of Liturgical Theology.

Here are some of the topics explored in this episode:

What is “liturgy”?

What is “mysticism”?

The significance of baptism.

Understanding “teleology”. What’s the telos of a human being?

Understanding the connection between the interior heart personal liturgy and the exterior sacramental public liturgy

From the discussion with Dr. Fagerberg:

“… everything was directed towards a certain end, there was a telos, teleology. The telos of our watches is to tell time, the telos of a knife is to cut. What’s the telos of a human being?  Deification, adoption, being taken up into the circulation of the life of the Trinity. How do you make that journey? That’s liturgical. That’s the ascetical struggle. That’s the discipline of spiritual warfare. That’s mysticism. That’s the allure theological in the way the Eastern fathers defined telógia, a union with God. The objective here is union with God. Well, if that’s the telos, the teleological end is our union with God, then everything, not just Sunday morning for 55 minutes, everything in our life and all aspects of our life, liturgical, theological, ascetical, and mystical.”

More taken from the discussion:

“There’s a book on liturgy by an Eastern Rite. Catholic named John Carbone, who takes the imagery from the book of revelation of liturgy as a river flowing from the throne of God. Oh, it’s not like, something that I’m trying to produce. Liturgy isn’t my production. Liturgy is the river of life flowing from the throne of God. And I imagined it landing first in the church in order to make this Mystical Body of Christ. It lands first in the baptismal font, but the font fills up and the river of liturgy overflows the lip of the baptismal font and it hits us.

And now it becomes our personal liturgy. Besides the public Church liturgy, there’s an interior heart personal liturgy. And I thought that’s liturgical mysticism. That’s liturgy happening at an interior mystical spiritual level. That’s an attempt to connect liturgical mysticism with the work of the Church. I surely am not suggesting that there are two tracks and some people like Church and priests and a lot of incense, and other people like to go in their room and pray by themselves. No, no, no. The interior heart personal liturgy must be connected to the exterior sacramental public liturgy.”


For more podcast episodes of this series visit the
Pathways to Sacred Mysteries w/Dr. David Fagerberg page


David W. Fagerberg is Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He holds masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St. John’s University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and Yale University. His Ph.D. is from Yale University in liturgical theology.

Fagerberg’s work has explored how the Church’s lex credendi (law of belief) is founded upon the Church’s lex orandi (law of prayer). This was expressed in Theologia Prima (Hillenbrand Books, 2003). He has integrated into this the Eastern Orthodox understanding of asceticism by considering its role in preparing the liturgical person. This was treated in On Liturgical Asceticism (Catholic University Press, 2013). And these two themes come together in Consecrating the World: On Mundane Liturgical Theology (Angelico Press, 2016).

He also has an avocation in G. K. Chesterton, having published Chesterton is Everywhere (Emmaus Press, 2013) and The Size of Chesterton’s Catholicism (University of Notre Dame, 1998).

 


Here are a few of Dr. Fagerberg’s books:
Liturgical Theology Liturgical Mysticism Liturgical Theology Theological Theology

SJC8 – The Will’s Capacity for Love – St. John of the Cross with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast

SJC8 – The Will’s Capacity for Love – St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast

In this series Fr. Donald Haggerty and Kris McGregor discuss the depths of prayer as explored by St. John of the Cross, the Mystical Doctor of the Church.

An excerpt from St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation 

For Saint John of the Cross, it is not simply the pleasures and enjoyments of the senses in themselves that are the crux of the problem. The human experience of sense satisfaction is unavoidable. Even the desert monks of the early Christian centuries, who took on extreme physical hardships, no doubt preferred the taste of one cooked leaf to another or found one cool spring of water a better choice over another. The Gospel recounts that Saint John the Baptist, in his desert, along with his consumption of the unpalatable locusts, survived also on honey. The Christian perspective in this matter, when it is healthy, advocates a balanced approach. It does not propose a denigration of bodily life to the point of destroying or damaging it. We are an inseparable unity of body and soul as human persons, and bodily life has a sacred dimension, a truth that has far-reaching consequences in morality. But that unity of body and soul is precisely the point and the issue of importance in asceticism. Nothing of bodily life can be lived as though detached from the soul’s existence.

Even more to the point, bodily pursuits inevitably engage the will. The will and its desires remain always in a kind of dynamic consort with bodily, emotional, and intellectual activity. At the same time, the will is a primary reality in our lives by the manner in which it cooperates with or rebels against the graced invitations of God. Seeking union with God demands a deeply rooted determination of our soul to give our will fully in love to God. This cannot be accomplished without the desires of the will aligning themselves with the goal of a union with God’s will in all facets of bodily, emotional, and intellectual life. Most importantly, the will is the faculty of love in the soul. The will must be empty of desires for gratification if by a great love it is to seek for God as a primary desire. All that touches and enters into the desires of the will is crucial for the possibility of a union with God by means of love. It remains now to explain how the will in its capacity for love is affected by the principles of self-denial and asceticism. These two statements from book 2 of The Ascent to Mount Carmel in effect define the nature of sanctity and at the same time express the essential importance of the will’s purification in sanctity.

Haggerty, Donald. Saint John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation (pp. 107-108). Ignatius Press. Kindle Edition.


You find the book on which this series is based here

SJC7 – Asceticism: Recovery of a Neglected Value – St. John of the Cross with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast

SJC7 – Asceticism: Recovery of a Neglected Value – St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast

In this series Fr. Donald Haggerty and Kris McGregor discuss the depths of prayer as explored by St. John of the Cross, the Mystical Doctor of the Church.

An excerpt from St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation 

In this chapter we take up a subject planted more firmly on the ground, namely, Saint John of the Cross’ instructions in book 1 of The Ascent of Mount Carmel on asceticism and self-denial. This teaching will make better sense now after we have seen his understanding of the great role of purification in the human faculties for the sake of union with God. Unfortunately, asceticism is a largely forgotten word in contemporary spirituality, despite its importance in the Catholic tradition. In truth, it has never been a treasured topic or a popular Catholic pursuit. It has always been subject to exaggerated notions that distort it and empty it of value. Today another reason may exist for its virtual disappearance from spiritual teaching, which is the excessive focus on the inward path of silent meditative practices that has lately preoccupied spirituality. Writings on the quest for God through methods of meditative mindfulness typically ignore self-denial or bodily discipline as a prerequisite for spiritual growth. This is not to say that these writings encourage moral laxity, but simply that a need for some commitment to asceticism and to real practices of self-denial is nowhere to be found in them. Frankly, this is not a good sign of their value as a teaching for souls seeking a closer relationship with God. The neglect of an ascetical element in the pursuit of God leaves unaddressed the retention of indulgent tendencies in a life. The effort of seeking God ends up then often as a self-absorbed quest, instead of a pure and sacrificial pursuit in response to Jesus’ own words in the Gospel and in imitation of saintly lives.

Haggerty, Donald. Saint John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation (p. 101). Ignatius Press. Kindle Edition.


You find the book on which this series is based here

SJC6 – Intense Certitude of Love – St. John of the Cross with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast


SJC6 – Intense Certitude of Love – St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast

In this series Fr. Donald Haggerty and Kris McGregor discuss the depths of prayer as explored by St. John of the Cross, the Mystical Doctor of the Church.  In this episode, they continue their conversation on that which leads to the experience of the Dark Nights often associated with St. John of the Cross

An excerpt from St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation 

The initial insecurity of a darkened experience in faith, advancing by unknowing, surely requires some adjustment and an assimilation. However, the insecurity need not continue interminably. The deliberate refusal of satisfaction for the intellect in prayer may be for a certain period of purification a radical austerity for the intellect. But the result in time can be to sense a door opening into a purer encounter with God himself. He who is infinite mystery in his being must be approached in the unknown truth of his infinitude as Someone known and loved. Intensity of faith accompanies the more intense love that unites us personally to God. As heard earlier in this chapter and worth repeating: “Only by means of faith, in divine light exceeding all understanding, does God manifest himself to the soul. The greater one’s faith, the closer is one’s union with God” (AMC 2.9.1). A pure, naked faith will come to know the presence of God in a more intense certitude of love. Every other sense of understanding God must be subjugated in prayer to the truth of God as the exceedingly Almighty One who is loved. In the following passage, Saint John of the Cross insists on the vigor of an intense desire needed for the pursuit of God precisely when our intellect in faith is submerged in an incomprehension of God’s ultimate mystery. This longer quotation conveys how narrow and serious is the road into the night of contemplation where a blessed contact with God awaits the depths of a soul in its prayer.

Haggerty, Donald. Saint John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation (pp. 78-79). Ignatius Press. Kindle Edition.


You find the book on which this series is based here

SJC5 – Mystery of Believing – St. John of the Cross with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast


SJC5 – Mystery of Believing – St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast

In this series Fr. Donald Haggerty and Kris McGregor discuss the depths of prayer as explored by St. John of the Cross, the Mystical Doctor of the Church.  In this episode, they continue their conversation on that which leads to the experience of the Dark Nights often associated with St. John of the Cross

An excerpt from St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation 

The urgent need of the soul in prayer must be, as such, to adopt a radical exercise of pure faith in its approach to God. At the point in the spiritual life when contemplative graces are beginning to stir, it is time to lift anchor, as it were, and plunge into deeper waters of faith: “Those who want to reach union with God should advance neither by understanding, nor by the support of their own experience, nor by feeling or imagination, but by belief in God’s being” (AMC 2.4.4). The last phrase “belief in God’s being” may seem ordinary enough. Is that not simply what faith is—to believe in God? But quickly we should recall the real demand in the deeper act of faith—a pure faith—that must take place in contemplative prayer. We must believe in God precisely as One who is beyond our measure or grasp or comprehension. We must adhere to him, search and seek for him, as infinite mystery and as a personal presence of love immediately engaged with us in the current hour of silent prayer. In short, we must enter into faith itself, into the mystery of believing, to approach the personal mystery of God. We believe in him in the prayer of contemplation as we surrender our being into him. We give way to him and allow him to abide in us: “For God’s being cannot be grasped by the intellect, appetite, imagination, or any other sense; nor can it be known in this life. The most that can be felt and tasted of God in this life is infinitely distant from God and the pure possession of him” (AMC 2.4.4).

Haggerty, Donald. Saint John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation (p. 76). Ignatius Press. Kindle Edition.


You find the book on which this series is based here

HP5 – Prayer and Confession – The Heart of Prayer with Fr. Éamonn Bourke – Discerning Hearts Podcast

HP5 – Prayer and Confession – The Heart of Prayer with Fr. Éamonn Bourke

Fr. Éamonn Bourke and Kris McGregor explore the why, how, and what of “prayer”.  In this episode, they explore the sacrament of confession in conjunction with prayer.  They discuss how confession can affect and even strengthen our prayer life.

Here is an excerpt from their conversation:

Fr. Éamonn Bourke:

We’re living in a world of temptation. We’re living in a world of distraction. We’re living in a world that doesn’t want to delay gratification and wants everything today and now. And we want our own way and we want things to go the way we want them to go. And our plans to unfold the way we want them to go. So we’re bogged down at times in our own sinfulness. And especially when our sin, maybe, has accumulated from lack of confession. Particularly because confession, probably universally, has lessened and especially attendance has. So, if people haven’t been going to confession regularly and the sin mounts opened their life, they can actually feel themselves to be in a state of being unloved and unlovable. Like, “how could God love me now, after all that I’ve done? And why would God be interested in me because of my sinful life?

And “you know, I’ve done too much damage to my spiritual life that I’ve blown it almost with the Lord“, you know? So, it’s even coming into the recognition that look, nobody, is finished with God’s love. God is love. God can’t stop loving us. That’s just the bottom line. And, especially as we are his children and He sees our pain, He’s actually moved with more compassion than we can imagine. I’m not saying that the greater the sin, the greater compassion, because God has always equally compassionate of all His children, but it means that He definitely does see the extent of our pain and He doesn’t reject us or draw back from us. If anything, He just wants to enter into the mystery of our pain and to heal it and to remove it from our soul, so that we can be free again.

Father Éamonn Bourke is a priest of the Archdiocese of Dublin, Ireland, and served as Vocations Director for the diocese, as well as Pastor in a number of its parishes. Trained as a spiritual director in the contemplative style, he now serves as Chaplain to University College, Dublin, the largest University in Ireland.

⇨For more episodes in the series visit: The Heart of Prayer with Fr. Éamonn Bourke – Discerning Hearts Podcasts

 

SJC4 – Pure Faith in Contemplative Prayer – St. John of the Cross with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast


SJC4 – Pure Faith in Contemplative Prayer – St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation with Fr. Donald Haggerty – Discerning Hearts Podcast

In this series Fr. Donald Haggerty and Kris McGregor discuss the depths of prayer as explored by St. John of the Cross, the Mystical Doctor of the Church.  In this episode, they continue their conversation on that which leads to the experience of the Dark Nights often associated with St. John of the Cross

An excerpt from St. John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation 

In this case, under the influence of deeper faith, the cooperation involves a mortification by the intellect: an emptying of the desire for spiritual gratifications that can be enjoyed by the intellect in the life of prayer. These can be sought in a way that becomes an impediment to the pure pursuit of God for himself alone. A “complete pacification of the spiritual house” (AMC 2.1.2) is required that will “quiet down” the impulse to pursue experiences of an intellectual or imaginative satisfaction in prayer. This “ascetical” task for the intellect in the interior life of prayer entails, in a telling phrase, “the negation through pure faith of all the spiritual faculties and gratifications and appetites” (AMC 2.1.2). What this “pure faith” will mean as a virtue of the intellect in contemplation needs to be explained with some care. For the intellect must cooperate in its own purification precisely through this exercise of pure faith. Taking us farther along in explanation, and referring to the stanza of his poem, Saint John of the Cross comments: “The soul, consequently, affirms that it departed ‘in darkness, and secure.’ For anyone fortunate enough to possess the ability to journey in the obscurity of faith, as do the blind with their guide, and depart from all natural phantasms [images] and intellectual reasonings, walks securely. . . . For the less a soul works with its own abilities, the more securely it proceeds, because its progress in faith is greater” (AMC 2.1.2, 3).

Haggerty, Donald. Saint John of the Cross: Master of Contemplation (pp. 67-68). Ignatius Press. Kindle Edition.


You find the book on which this series is based here

HP4 – Prayer and Forgiveness – The Heart of Prayer with Fr. Éamonn Bourke – Discerning Hearts Podcast


HP4 – Prayer and Forgiveness – The Heart of Prayer with Fr. Éamonn Bourke

Fr. Éamonn Bourke and Kris McGregor explore the why, how, and what of “prayer”.  In this episode, they explore the healing nature of prayer.  They discuss how the role of forgiveness in our daily prayer.

Here is an excerpt from their conversation:

Fr. Éamonn Bourke:

Okay. One of the things that often kind of holds people back is their own sinfulness, and sinfulness can be quite embarrassing in life. You know where they say that things that happen in secret, in the dark places, we often don’t want to see in the light. You know? And our own broken sinfulness can make us blush at times and can cause us to step back from prayer and step back from God and say, “Well, God’s not interested in me.” I just want you to know that there is nothing that you can’t share with God. There is no weakness, brokenness, sinfulness that can’t be shared with him, because he is not going to judge us in prayer. He’s going to just love us in prayer.

So whatever is holding you back, whatever is causing you to step away from prayer, that’s what you need to bring to God in prayer. So don’t let there be any barriers between yourself and God or any secrets between yourself and God. And if you can share the secrets, the wounded, broken, embarrassing secrets of our life with God in prayer, then your life is at rights. You know? You have nothing to fear, so don’t hold back. Start today.

Father Éamonn Bourke is a priest of the Archdiocese of Dublin, Ireland, and served as Vocations Director for the diocese, as well as Pastor in a number of its parishes. Trained as a spiritual director in the contemplative style, he now serves as Chaplain to University College, Dublin, the largest University in Ireland.

⇨For more episodes in the series visit: The Heart of Prayer with Fr. Éamonn Bourke – Discerning Hearts Podcasts