IP#477 – Fr. Timothy Gallagher – When You Struggle In The Spiritual Life on Inside the Pages with Kris McGregor Podcast

Fr. Timothy Gallagher OMVIn When You Struggle In the Spiritual Life: An Ignatian Path to Freedom, Fr. Timothy Gallagher, O.M.V., addresses the everyday challenges of those seeking a deeper relationship with God. Drawing from the spiritual wisdom of St. Ignatius of Loyola and the second rule of his classic discernment of spirits, Fr. Gallagher breaks open the four ways in which the enemy is going to try to discourage persons from moving more closely to God. And the five ways in which the good spirit is going to try to encourage persons on their journey.  It was a delight to discuss this lovely book…highly recommended!

Discerning Hearts PodcastYou can find the book here
From the book description:

Once a person embarks on a spiritual journey questions and roadblocks will come up. Ignatian spirituality and practices hold a treasure of answers, and no one can explain Ignatian lifestyles as can Fr. Timothy Gallagher. – This little volume of clear and practical guidelines is invaluable for anyone wanting to grow spiritually. In this new volume, Fr. Gallagher explores additional understandings and applications of the Ignatian rules. These personal reflections have arisen from the delight—and the labor—of learning and sharing the rules, witnessing the joy and hope they have given to so many. These Ignatian guidelines set captives free from the discouragement and sadness of spiritual desolation. They offer hope precisely where persons may have felt hope was not possible—and so release new energy for the spiritual journey.

For more from Fr. Timothy Gallagher on Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts visit: Fr. Timothy Gallagher – Discernment of Spirits Podcasts

PSM3 – Living Mystery in the Mundane – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Dr. David Fagerberg

Episode 3 – Living Mystery in the Mundane  – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg Ph.D.

Dr. David Fagerberg and Kris McGregor discuss how “mundane” liturgical theology consecrates the world and sanctifies our daily life.

Here are some of the topics explored in this episode:

What is a “mundane” liturgical theology?

The call to holiness is here and now.

How the Church serves a Mother.

Why liturgy? Why worship? Why are we called?

 

From the discussion with Dr. Fagerberg:

So where are you going to practice your asceticism, not sitting in your office, reading a book and thinking lofty thoughts about the human race, but when that colleague bugs me in this office meeting, when one more time I have to admit that Elizabeth is right, but I’m too stubborn to do so overcoming those passions of pride and vainglory and ego and avarice and gluttony and, and envy and backbiting… tiny little actions, day by day, movement by movement.  St. John Chrysostom has a terrific homily on Ephesians which he says that the poor that you meet in the city, in the public square, the poor are another altar on which you can make your Eucharistic sacrifice. You’re so happy to have been in the church where there’s this stone altar that was, honored and revered because it bore upon it, the body and blood of Christ. Well, here is Christ in the person of the poor.  Look, how generous God is to you. He’s given you a thousand chances a day to make another liturgical act, another Eucharistic sacrifice. And just when I think I’ve satisfied my quarter, he sends another one to me, what a good and generous God we have.

More taken from the discussion:

Chesterton was asked why he became a Catholic. And his answer was because we’re sinners. And because we have a God who loves us passionately. And so this is what God has done in order to rectify the problem. I think God always had intended to bring us home to him, to let us join the life of God, to enter the perichoresis of the Trinity. It’s not like that was plan A and then after the fall in the garden of Eden, he moved on to plan B redemption is a completion of creation. Creation was the beginning of redemption. So his goal is for our sanctification, our adoption, our deification, and God gets the ball rolling with the salvation history.

David W. Fagerberg is Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He holds masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St. John’s University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and Yale University. His Ph.D. is from Yale University in liturgical theology.


For more podcast episodes of this series visit the
Pathways to Sacred Mysteries w/Dr. David Fagerberg page


David W. Fagerberg is Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He holds masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St. John’s University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and Yale University. His Ph.D. is from Yale University in liturgical theology.

Fagerberg’s work has explored how the Church’s lex credendi (law of belief) is founded upon the Church’s lex orandi (law of prayer). This was expressed in Theologia Prima (Hillenbrand Books, 2003). He has integrated into this the Eastern Orthodox understanding of asceticism by considering its role in preparing the liturgical person. This was treated in On Liturgical Asceticism (Catholic University Press, 2013). And these two themes come together in Consecrating the World: On Mundane Liturgical Theology (Angelico Press, 2016).

He also has an avocation in G. K. Chesterton, having published Chesterton is Everywhere (Emmaus Press, 2013) and The Size of Chesterton’s Catholicism (University of Notre Dame, 1998).

 


Here are a few of Dr. Fagerberg’s books:
Liturgical Theology Liturgical Mysticism Liturgical Theology Theological Theology

PSM2 – Liturgy as the Mystical Encounter – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Dr. David Fagerberg

Episode 2 – Liturgy as the Mystical Encounter  – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg Ph.D.

Dr. David Fagerberg and Kris McGregor discuss liturgy as the mystical encounter with our spouse, with our bridegroom Christ

Here are some of the topics explored in this episode:

What melody is this liturgy supposed to be creating?

What is Liturgical Asceticism?

The influence of the Desert Fathers and St. Benedict of Nursia.

Who’s liturgy should we be doing on Sunday morning?

Whose liturgy should we be doing in our lives?

From the discussion with Dr. Fagerberg:

There’s an ascetical effort and the mystical takes flight. I’ve seen pictures of birds that take lots and lots of steps. Oh, I’ve seen them take off from water. We might as well go back to baptismal imagery. Here’s the bird running along the surface of the waterfall. He’s flapping his wings and then takes off. the feet are the asceticism and the wings are mysticism.

 

More taken from the discussion:

The mystery of Christ, it sounds like the faithful are enabled to be mystics. So the definition finally arrives in 10 69. The word liturgy originally meant a public work, a service in the name of, or on behalf of the people. This was a Schmiemann phrase. The liturgy is the work of a few on behalf of the many. In ancient Rome, paying your taxes was called the liturgy. This was what you did for the sake of the public polis space. When the rich, sponsored a civic improvement project and made new roads, or when they sponsored a series of games in the Coliseum, not killing Christians, I presume, but chariot races, this was called their liturgy. It’s their contribution for the good of the city. Someone is doing a work to benefit others.

That’s the definition of the word liturgy. According to Catechism 10.69, which continues in Christian tradition, it means participation of the people of God in the work of God, the work of a few on behalf of the many, in this case, the work of three, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit on behalf of the human race, which stands cut off from God, alienated in death. The Father’s will is to destroy death and raise us to return a life through the Son and the Holy Spirit. And the work of salvation has unfolded from the bossom of the Father. So through liturgy Christ, our Redeemer and high priest continues the work of our redemption in, with, and through his liturgy. Through the liturgy, Christ continues his work of redemption. So who’s liturgy should we be doing on Sunday morning? Not mine, not yours. Christ’s work of redemption should be continued.  Christ. When I meet my neighbor, I must be via Christ to him. She must be a Christ to me. This expands beyond the 50 minutes and the mystery, which Christ enacted by his passion, this pasta is a mystery that takes us up into it. And that’s why we’re mystics.

 


For more podcast episodes of this series visit the
Pathways to Sacred Mysteries w/Dr. David Fagerberg page


David W. Fagerberg is Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He holds masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St. John’s University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and Yale University. His Ph.D. is from Yale University in liturgical theology.

Fagerberg’s work has explored how the Church’s lex credendi (law of belief) is founded upon the Church’s lex orandi (law of prayer). This was expressed in Theologia Prima (Hillenbrand Books, 2003). He has integrated into this the Eastern Orthodox understanding of asceticism by considering its role in preparing the liturgical person. This was treated in On Liturgical Asceticism (Catholic University Press, 2013). And these two themes come together in Consecrating the World: On Mundane Liturgical Theology (Angelico Press, 2016).

He also has an avocation in G. K. Chesterton, having published Chesterton is Everywhere (Emmaus Press, 2013) and The Size of Chesterton’s Catholicism (University of Notre Dame, 1998).

 


Here are a few of Dr. Fagerberg’s books:
Liturgical Theology Liturgical Mysticism Liturgical Theology Theological Theology

PSM1 – The River of Liturgy – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Dr. David Fagerberg

Episode 1 – The River of the Liturgy – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg Ph.D.

Dr. David Fagerberg and Kris McGregor begin this 16 episode series that explores various aspects of Liturgical Theology.

Here are some of the topics explored in this episode:

What is “liturgy”?

What is “mysticism”?

The significance of baptism.

Understanding “teleology”. What’s the telos of a human being?

Understanding the connection between the interior heart personal liturgy and the exterior sacramental public liturgy

From the discussion with Dr. Fagerberg:

“… everything was directed towards a certain end, there was a telos, teleology. The telos of our watches is to tell time, the telos of a knife is to cut. What’s the telos of a human being?  Deification, adoption, being taken up into the circulation of the life of the Trinity. How do you make that journey? That’s liturgical. That’s the ascetical struggle. That’s the discipline of spiritual warfare. That’s mysticism. That’s the allure theological in the way the Eastern fathers defined telógia, a union with God. The objective here is union with God. Well, if that’s the telos, the teleological end is our union with God, then everything, not just Sunday morning for 55 minutes, everything in our life and all aspects of our life, liturgical, theological, ascetical, and mystical.”

More taken from the discussion:

“There’s a book on liturgy by an Eastern Rite. Catholic named John Carbone, who takes the imagery from the book of revelation of liturgy as a river flowing from the throne of God. Oh, it’s not like, something that I’m trying to produce. Liturgy isn’t my production. Liturgy is the river of life flowing from the throne of God. And I imagined it landing first in the church in order to make this Mystical Body of Christ. It lands first in the baptismal font, but the font fills up and the river of liturgy overflows the lip of the baptismal font and it hits us.

And now it becomes our personal liturgy. Besides the public Church liturgy, there’s an interior heart personal liturgy. And I thought that’s liturgical mysticism. That’s liturgy happening at an interior mystical spiritual level. That’s an attempt to connect liturgical mysticism with the work of the Church. I surely am not suggesting that there are two tracks and some people like Church and priests and a lot of incense, and other people like to go in their room and pray by themselves. No, no, no. The interior heart personal liturgy must be connected to the exterior sacramental public liturgy.”


For more podcast episodes of this series visit the
Pathways to Sacred Mysteries w/Dr. David Fagerberg page


David W. Fagerberg is Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He holds masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St. John’s University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and Yale University. His Ph.D. is from Yale University in liturgical theology.

Fagerberg’s work has explored how the Church’s lex credendi (law of belief) is founded upon the Church’s lex orandi (law of prayer). This was expressed in Theologia Prima (Hillenbrand Books, 2003). He has integrated into this the Eastern Orthodox understanding of asceticism by considering its role in preparing the liturgical person. This was treated in On Liturgical Asceticism (Catholic University Press, 2013). And these two themes come together in Consecrating the World: On Mundane Liturgical Theology (Angelico Press, 2016).

He also has an avocation in G. K. Chesterton, having published Chesterton is Everywhere (Emmaus Press, 2013) and The Size of Chesterton’s Catholicism (University of Notre Dame, 1998).

 


Here are a few of Dr. Fagerberg’s books:
Liturgical Theology Liturgical Mysticism Liturgical Theology Theological Theology

IP#375 – Bishop Donald Hying – Love Never Fails on Inside the Pages with Kris McGregor



What a delight to talk with Bishop Donald Hying, bishop of the diocese of Madison, WI, about his book Love Never Fails: Living the Catholic Faith in Our Daily Lives! The book is steeped in wisdom from the heart of a contemplative bishop who is very much active in everyday life.  He guides us all with his down-to-earth teaching on prayer and helps us to respond to the universal call to holiness.  It is said that you can’t give what you don’t have, and it’s truly evident that Bishop Hying has it … a love that never fails.  We highly recommended this book and that you connect with Bishop Hying on Facebook to catch his daily video reflections!

You can find the book here

From the book description

The spiritual fruit of much pastoral experience, this book addresses both perennial and current issues facing Catholics in the world today. Ranging from the interior life of prayer and devotion to the practicalities of evangelization and virtue, Bishop Hying offers contemporary and practical insights into the depths of the Catholic faith and how to live it with heroism and humility. He gives a particular focus on the person of Jesus Christ–his identity, mission, and presence in our lives.

As a pastor of souls a good Bishop must apply theology to the lives of the people he serves. These reflections are born from the heart and mind of a pastor who has served in varied contexts of priestly and episcopal ministry, including suburban, inner city, Hispanic, seminary formation, and missionary settings. In the beauty, challenge, grace, and complexity of interacting with a wide variety of people sincerely striving to be holy, Bishop Hying has learned much about the efficacy of God’s purpose and action in human lives and events. This book seeks to feed the Christian soul, mind, and heart.

 

SWR-10 – Rule 5 and an introduction to Rule 6 – The Second Week Rules for the Discernment of Spirits w/ Fr. Timothy Gallagher – Discerning Hearts Podcast



Fr. Timothy Gallagher OMV

Episode 10 – Rule 5 and introduction to Rule 6 – The Second Week Rules for the Discernment of Spirits: An Ignatian Guide to a Greater Discernment of Spirits with Fr. Timothy Gallagher

Fr. Gallagher completes his teachings on Rule 5 and moves to understanding Rule 6.  Once we have learned from the course of things, the beginning, middle, and the end, and perceive the work of the enemy, now it is time to learn from the “little by little” how the enemy works to tempt us with the “good.”

Fifth Rule.

The fifth: We should give much attention to the course of the thoughts; and if the beginning, middle and end is all good, inclined to all good, it is a sign of the good angel; but if in the course of the thoughts that he brings, it ends in something bad, or distractive, or less good than the soul had proposed to do before, or if it weakens it, or disquiets, or troubles the soul, taking away the peace, tranquility and quiet, which it had before, it is a clear sign that it proceeds from the bad spirit, the enemy of our profit and eternal salvation.(333)

 

Sixth Rule.

The sixth: When the enemy of human nature has been perceived and known by his serpent’s tail and the bad end to which he induces, it profits the person who was tempted by him, to look immediately at the course of the good thoughts that he brought, and the beginning of them, and how little by little he procured to make him descend from the sweetness and spiritual gladness in which he was, till he brought him to his depraved intention; so that with such an experience known and noted he may guard himself in the future from his customary deceits. (334)

Through a series of compelling conference talks, Fr. Gallagher carefully breaks open St. Ignatius of Loyola’s Second Week Rules for Greater Discernment.  This set of 8 “rules” (or guidelines) helps us to discern whether a seemingly good, noble, holy idea or feeling, often understood as a “spiritual consolation,” could be a working of the enemy intending to lead us astray. He shows how all of us can learn to listen to and follow God’s gentle leading in our daily lives.

For other episodes in this series, visit The Second Week Rules for the Discernment Spirits with Fr. Timothy Gallagher – DH Page.


Spiritual Consolation
This series is based on Spiritual Consolation by Fr. Timothy Gallagher.

You can find the book here.

Also, here are the 2 handouts mentioned by Fr. Gallagher in Talk 2:

Guidance for a Greater Discernment of Spirits with Fr. Timothy Gallagher O.M.V.

For the  PDF document:  

Handout Number 1 – The Text of the 8 Rules of the Second Week
https://www.discerninghearts.com/Gallagher/The_Text_of_the_Rules.pdf

Handout Number 2 – Examples – Discernment of Spirits – 2nd Week rules
https://www.discerninghearts.com/Gallagher/EXAMPLES-DISCERNMENT_OF_SPIRITS-SECOND_WEEK_RULES.pdf


The Sacrament of Healing – Building a Kingdom of Love with Msgr. John Esseff Podcast

Msgr. Esseff reflects on the Anointing of the Sick, known as one of the Sacraments of Healing.  He speaks of his personal experience with the sacrament and the importance of having it readily available for the faithful.  Msgr. Esseff also addresses particular issues related to laying on of hands.

 From the USSCB:

Jesus came to heal the whole person, body and soul.

In the Church’s Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick, through the ministry of the priest, it is Jesus who touches the sick to heal them from sin – and sometimes even from physical ailment. His cures were signs of the arrival of the Kingdom of God. The core message of his healing tells us of his plan to conquer sin and death by his dying and rising.

The Rite of Anointing tells us there is no need to wait until a person is at the point of death to receive the Sacrament. A careful judgment about the serious nature of the illness is sufficient.

When the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick is given, the hoped-for effect is that, if it be God’s will, the person be physically healed of illness. But even if there is no physical healing, the primary effect of the Sacrament is a spiritual healing by which the sick person receives the Holy Spirit’s gift of peace and courage to deal with the difficulties that accompany serious illness or the frailty of old age.

~from the United States Catholic Catechism for Adults en español

Pray

Learn

Act

Scripture: Mark 1:40-45

40 And a leper came to him begging him, and kneeling said to him, “If you will, you can make me clean.” 41 Moved with pity, he stretched out his hand and touched him, and said to him, “I will; be clean.” 42 And immediately the leprosy left him, and he was made clean. 43 And he sternly charged him, and sent him away at once, 44 and said to him, “See that you say nothing to any one; but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer for your cleansing what Moses commanded, for a proof to the people.” 45 But he went out and began to talk freely about it, and to spread the news, so that Jesus could no longer openly enter a town, but was out in the country; and people came to him from every quarter.

Scripture quotations from Common Bible: Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright 1973, and Ignatius Edition of the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright 2006, by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

SWR-3 – When to Apply the Rules – The Second Week Rules for the Discernment of Spirits w/ Fr. Timothy Gallagher – Discerning Hearts Podcast



Fr. Timothy Gallagher OMV

Episode 3 – When to Apply the Rules – The Second Week Rules for the Discernment of Spirits: An Ignatian Guide to a Greater Discernment of Spirits with Fr. Timothy Gallagher

Fr. Gallagher, by using St. Ignatius’ 10th Annotation, continues to break open the Title Statement and describes those who need the second set of rules.  Such a person in the second spiritual situation, as described in the teaching, is mature, dedicated, generous, deeply loves the Lord, and desires to dedicate his or her life to the Lord.  They have a solid, faithful life of prayer and service in their vocations. This is a set of rules to protect the beauty of that portrait so that the enemy is not able to lead the soul astray through any temptation under the appearance of good and it goes solidly toward the Lord.

The Title Statement:  “Rules for the same effect with greater discernment of spirits, and they help more for the second week. (328)

 

Tenth Annotation.  The tenth: When the one who gives the exercises perceives that the one who receives them is assaulted and tempted under the appearance of good, then it is proper to explain to him the rules for the second week already mentioned.  For the enemy of human nature commonly tempts more under the appearance of good when the person is exercising himself in the illuminative life, which corresponds to the exercises of the second week, and not so much in the purgative life, which corresponds to the exercises of the first week.

Through a series of compelling conference talks, Fr. Gallagher carefully breaks open St. Ignatius of Loyola’s Second Week Rules for Greater Discernment.  This set of 8 “rules” (or guidelines) helps us to discern whether a seemingly good, noble, holy idea or feeling, often understood as a “spiritual consolation,” could be a working of the enemy intending to lead us astray. He shows how all of us can learn to listen to and follow God’s gentle leading in our daily lives.

For other episodes in this series visit: The Second Week Rules for the Discernment Spirits with Fr. Timothy Gallagher – DH Page


Spiritual Consolation
This series is based on Spiritual Consolation by Fr. Timothy Gallagher

You can find the book here

Also, here are the 2 handouts mentioned by Fr. Gallagher in Talk 2:

Guidance for a Greater Discernment of Spirits with Fr. Timothy Gallagher O.M.V.

For the  PDF document:  

Handout Number 1 – The Text of the 8 Rules of the Second Week
https://www.discerninghearts.com/Gallagher/The_Text_of_the_Rules.pdf

Handout Number 2 – Examples – Discernment of Spirits – 2nd Week rules
https://www.discerninghearts.com/Gallagher/EXAMPLES-DISCERNMENT_OF_SPIRITS-SECOND_WEEK_RULES.pdf


IP#372 – Kathleen Beckman – “The Holy Family” part 2 – A Family Guide to Spiritual Warfare on Inside the Pages w/ Kris McGregor Podcast


Part 2

Kathleen Beckman returns to discuss the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. Joseph as found in her book, A Family Guide to Spiritual Warfare: Strategies for Deliverance and Healing!  In our first conversation with Kathleen  (see the link below), we discussed the reality of spiritual warfare and the damage it does to individuals and families.  In this episode, we asked Kathleen to join us once again in order to discuss the role of the Holy Family in our response to the enemy’s attacks.  She shines an important light on the role of St. Joseph and the Blessed Virgin Mary as true companions in our spiritual journey as well as allies in our spiritual battle!


You can find the book here:

From the book description

In A Family Guide to Spiritual Warfare, Kathleen Beckman offers you potent advice from her 12 years of active participation on an exorcist’s team. She shows you how to clean up your household by cultivating in your family a civilization of love and how to withstand the spiritual attacks that inevitably come to destroy the harmonious family life you create.

Beckman reveals how you can recognize diabolical disguises in your home and offers proven means of protection found only in the Church’s arsenal of spiritual weapons.

You’ll also learn the devil’s strategies how he does not necessarily seek to possess but simply to seed your family with the venom of hatred, desolation, envy, and vice. This, she explains, is why it s so important for spouses and children to become schooled in the art of spiritual combat. It’s the only way you can destroy the works of the devil and unmask the hidden evil that weaves in and out of your daily family life.

Along with more than two dozen effective prayers for family healing and deliverance, you’ll also learn:

  • How to understand the spirits working for and against your family, and what to do in response to them
  • What specific actions to take if you believe your family has come under the influence of demonic activity
  • How to use your baptismal, spousal, and parental authority in spiritual warfare
  • How curses can become effective and what can be done to counteract them
  • The difference between diabolical temptation, oppression, obsession, and possession
  • The seven ways your family can wear the full armor of God
  • The diabolical counterparts to each of the Ten Commandments and the Beatitudes
  • The 13 weapons you can use to defend yourself and your family against evil spirits

For more visit:

IP#371 – Kathleen Beckman – “The Holy Family” part 1 – A Family Guide to Spiritual Warfare on Inside the Pages w/ Kris McGregor Podcast

IP#367 – Kathleen Beckman – A Family Guide to Spiritual Warfare on Inside the Pages with Kris McGregor Podcast

 IP#262 Kathleen Beckman – Praying For Priests on Inside the Pages with Kris McGregor

For prayers with St. Joseph found on Discerning Hearts visit

St. Joseph, devotions and prayers, texts and mp3 downloads

 

SWR-2 Title Statement & Issue at Hand – The Second Week Rules for the Discernment of Spirits w/ Fr. Timothy Gallagher – Discerning Hearts Podcast



Fr. Timothy Gallagher OMV

Episode 2 – Teachings on the Title Statement and a look at the Issue at Hand – The Second Week Rules for the Discernment of Spirits: An Ignatian Guide to a Greater Discernment of Spirits with Fr. Timothy Gallagher

Fr. Gallagher breaks open the meaning of the term “greater discernment of spirits” and examens the issue at hand when entering second-week rule discernment

The Title Statement:  “Rules for the same effect with greater discernment of spirits, and they help more for the second week. (328)

First Rule. The first: it is proper to God and to his angels, in their movements, to give true joy and spiritual gladness, taking away all sadness and disturbance which the enemy induces; to whom it is proper to militate against that joy and spiritual consolation, bringing apparent reasons, subtleties and persistent fallacies. (329)

Through a series of compelling conference talks, Fr. Gallagher carefully breaks open St. Ignatius of Loyola’s Second Week Rules for Greater Discernment.  This set of 8 “rules” (or guidelines) helps us to discern whether a seemingly good, noble, holy idea or feeling, often understood as a “spiritual consolation,” could be a working of the enemy intending to lead us astray. He shows how all of us can learn to listen to and follow God’s gentle leading in our daily lives.

For other episodes in this series visit: The Second Week Rules for the Discernment Spirits with Fr. Timothy Gallagher – DH Page


Spiritual Consolation
This series is based on Spiritual Consolation by Fr. Timothy Gallagher

You can find the book here

Also, here are the 2 handouts mentioned by Fr. Gallagher in Talk 1:

Guidance for a Greater Discernment of Spirits with Fr. Timothy Gallagher O.M.V.

For the  PDF document:  

Handout Number 1 – The Text of the 8 Rules of the Second Week
https://www.discerninghearts.com/Gallagher/The_Text_of_the_Rules.pdf

Handout Number 2 – Examples – Discernment of Spirits – 2nd Week rules
https://www.discerninghearts.com/Gallagher/EXAMPLES-DISCERNMENT_OF_SPIRITS-SECOND_WEEK_RULES.pdf