RN-5 – Value # 4 – Justice – Regnum Novum w/ Omar Gutierrez podcast

 Truth, Freedom, Justice, and Love part 2 “Justice”

These are the four values of the Social Teaching of the Catholic Church as they’re enumerated in the Compendium and as they were laid out by, again, St. Pope John XXIII in Mater et magistra and Pacem in terris. Without these values, the work of social justice becomes an albatross around our necks. It pulls us down, threatening to poison all the work we do, no matter how well intentioned.

Justice requires we know what is due to our neighbor. But even when justice is achieved, it can be cold and impersonal, as Pope John Paul II said. This is why the phrase “social justice” appears so rarely in the Church’s Social Teaching. Justice is the bare minimum, and we are not looking for the minimum.

(Truth, Freedom and  Love are covered in other episodes)

True social justice requires that we drop these paradigms of opposition: management vs. labor; bourgeois vs. proletariat; state vs. individual. We own the great Catholic both/and. It applies to the Social Teaching of the Catholic Church more than ever.

Deacon Omar F. A. Guiterrez, M.A., studied Theology at the Franciscan University of Steubenville and at the Angelicum in Rome. He holds a Master’s of Arts degree in Theology from the University of Dallas. He has worked for the Church in various capacities including as a teacher and administrator. His expertise includes Catholic Social Teaching, and his writings on the subject have appeared in several national Catholic newspapers and periodicals. He’s also the author of “The Urging of Christ’s Love:  The Saints and The Social Teaching of the Catholic”

Also visit Omar’s “Discerning Hearts” page Catholic Social Teaching 101  urging-of-christs-love

BKL#14 – Building a Kingdom of Love w/ Msgr. John Esseff –The Queenship of the Blessed Virgin Mary

 

Msgr. Esseff reflects so beautifully about the Queenship of Mary…Queen of Heaven. He talks about the joys and peace of the heavenly encounter with our Blessed Mother and with the Holy Trinity. It is a very special reflection…not to be missed!


Msgr. John A. Esseff is a Roman Catholic priest in the Diocese of Scranton.  He was ordained on May 30th, 1953, by the late Bishop William J. Hafey, D.D. at St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton, PA.  Msgr. Esseff served as a retreat director and confessor to Blessed Mother Teresa.    He continues to offer direction and retreats for the sisters of the missionaries of charity around the world.  Msgr. Esseff encountered St.  Padre Pio,  who would become a spiritual father to him.  He has lived in areas around the world, serving in the Pontifical missions, a Catholic organization established by St. Pope John Paul II to bring the Good News to the world especially to the poor. He continues to serve as a retreat leader and director to bishops, priests and sisters and seminarians and other religious leaders around the world.

 

 

 

HR#5 “In place of spiritual homelessness, stability” – The Holy Rule of St. Benedict w/ Fr. Mauritius Wilde OSB podcast

 

In place of spiritual homelessness, stability

St.-Benedict-dFrom the Holy Rule of St. Benedict:

CHAPTER LXVI
Of the Porter of the Monastery

…If it can be done, the monastery should be so situated that all the necessaries, such as water, the mill, the garden, are enclosed, and the various arts may be plied inside of the monastery, so that there may be no need for the monks to go about outside, because it is not good for their souls. But we desire that this Rule be read quite often in the community, that none of the brethren may excuse himself of ignorance

 

Father Mauritius Wilde, OSB, Ph.D., did his philosophical, theological and doctoral studies in Europe. He is the author of several books and directs retreats regularly. He serves as Prior at Sant’Anselmo in Rome.

Only the Love of God the Father Can Restore Us by Anthony Lilles – A Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcast

 

Dr. Anthony Lilles reads for us an article he originally published on his Beginning to Pray blog.

Only the Love of God the Father Can Restore Us

The moral and spiritual crisis of our time is a crisis in fatherhood – a refusal to allow the Father to love us and the lack of courage to reveal the Father’s love and concern for the most vulnerable.  We see this reflected in the mentality that Church problems are fixed by money and programs – rather than conversion of heart and prayer. Just as no program can heal the heart of a child as much as the love of father and mother, no committee or policy can heal the Church apart from the love of God the Father. Yet, because so many have been abused or neglected by their fathers, we are afraid to draw attention to God the Father.

We see the Father as neither comfortable or convenient politically, socially or culturally.  We pretend that we do not come from Him and that we are not in His image and likeness. We presume that we have a right to take the blessings that belong to the Father, and to use them for our own social agendas and projects. To live on our own terms rather than His, we distance ourselves from His Love.

Since we will not draw close to our heavenly Father, we ourselves have forgotten how to be fathers.   Afraid to offend against dehumanizing ideologies, we do not speak of the Father’s goodness or wisdom, or offer His blessing to those who most need it. Shamed into silence and afraid to sound unsophisticated, we have allowed heartless jargon to replace what we can only find if we go to the heart of the Father. And fatherless societies beget walking wounded, children whose gaping emptiness torments them … even to the point that to relieve the pain, they abuse themselves and others. These fatherless children become adults — and now we live with generations suffering this nihilistic vacuum in which all that is innocent, good, holy, and true is sucked away. Even those who we trust have become like pigs — and have we not been drawn to their sty?

The love of the Father is so much more, so far beyond, so much more beautiful and tender than the limits of our feeble hearts allow us to feel or know. We are afraid of his paternal affection because we will not allow ourselves to become familiar with it — we are ignorant of just how much we are loved to our own downfall.  If only we would calm the internal rancor of our own thoughts and allow ourselves to listen to the deep movements of tender concern and gentle understanding that live in His Word!

To be kissed by the Father, to be taken into HIs embrace, this is no less than to surrender into a love that at once heals, purifies, reconstitutes, and transforms. This is the Gift of the Holy Spirit – its intensity and power cannot be overestimated. Such loves moves us against presumption to penance; against callousness to make restitution; against arrogance to humbly atone for what unaided human effort can never atone. The sheer immensity of the Father’s love raises us above ourselves — not only in our giftedness and excellences, but in our weaknesses and inadequacies — especially in the painful voids. Yes, there where love seems most absent, the Father is there with us — aching over our humiliation and shame, with life giving tears.

The Father’s heart is pierced by the plight of his children — He is never indifferent or aloof. This is what we read in the story of the Prodigal Son… Luke 15:11-32. The Father is deeply moved when He sees His son coming from a long way off.  The verb in Greek for “to pity, to have compassion” (ἐσπλαγχνίσθη) means that the deepest parts of one’s very being are moved, implicated, in the plight of another. This is the same word used in the parable of the Good Samaritan. It is also used when Jesus sees the crowds who have come to follow him.

When applied to God the Father, this means that the mysterious depths of God are implicated in our plight … that like of Father of the Prodigal Son, God the Father has taken our side. He is already running to us, ready to embrace, to kiss us with the affections of His love for us. Anyone who allows himself or herself to become the object of the Father’s love, such a person becomes like the Father, capable of being moved by the plight of those in distress. Such a movement of heart never sees strangers or enemies to be feared or used … only family to be cherished.

We live at a time when all of us need to come to our senses and consider how generous and good the Father is to everyone who serves Him.  Betrayal, denial, abandonment are not more patient than this healing love that both awaits and evokes our contrition. Avoiding responsibility has baptized us in desperate plight – it is time for the courage to face who we are, what we have done and to whom we have done it. No program or policy can  replace humility. No optics or media spin can heal the shame or cure the wounds we have caused. We may not feel that we are worthy to be his sons or daughters — but the One who begets, who loves life, wants us to live life to the full.

To approach the Father, we must follow the way of His Son – empty ourselves of our projects and ambitions, humble ourselves about our need for salvation, die to ourselves and our hubris. We approach Him in penance, fasting and prayer, realizing that in the immensity of His generous love, we are not worthy to be his slaves for His Son took the form of a slave… and, on this very cross road that His Son trod, the Father runs to meet us with the same love that He bears “the One in whom I am well pleased”. And in a silent fullness, we feel at once the comfort of His embrace; and the overwhelming goodness of His kiss. Healing and restoration await in the tender touch of those wetted cheeks and in those tears, divine and human, mingled through that hoped for, but surpassing, joy.

Anthony Lilles, S.T.D. is an associate professor and the academic dean of Saint John’s Seminary in Camarillo as well as the academic advisor for Juan Diego House of Priestly Formation for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. For over twenty years he served the Church in Northern Colorado where he joined and eventually served as dean of the founding faculty of Saint John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver. Through the years, clergy, seminarians, religious and lay faithful have benefited from his lectures and retreat conferences on the Carmelite Doctors of the Church and the writings of St. Elisabeth of the Trinity.

SJ1 – Holy Listening – The Spiritual Journey with Kris McGregor – A Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcast

“Let’s start at the very beginning, because it’s the very best place to start…”

“Holy Listening” is the lead topic of this first episode of “The Spiritual Journey Podcast with Kris McGregor.”  Appreciating the presence of God in the Word (capital W) and the challenge of truly listening to the voice of God are the primary topics for this podcast.  Before we can really move forward in the spiritual journey, we need to learn to listen to God.  How is that done?

The Gospel of John (RSVCE)

1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  2 He was in the beginning with God; 3 all things were made through him, and without him was not anything made that was made. 4 In him was life,a and the life was the light of men. 5 The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.

Psalm 1 (Jerusalem Bible)

1 Happy the man who never follows the advice of the wicked, or loiters on the way that sinners take, or sits about with scoffers,

2 but finds his pleasure in the Law of Yahweh, and murmurs his law day and night.

3 He is like a tree that is planted by water streams, yielding its fruit in season, its leaves never fading;

4 It is nothing like this with the wicked, nothing like this! No, these are like chaff blown away by the wind.

5 The wicked will not stand firm when judgment comes, nor sinners when the virtuous assemble.

6 For Yahweh takes care of the way the virtuous go, but the way of the wicked is doomed.

From the Holy Rule of St. Benedict:

Prologue:
1. Listen carefully, my son, to the master’s instructions, and attend to them with the ear of your heart. This is the advice from a father who loves you; welcome it, and faithfully put it into practice.

 

Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts mentioned in the podcast:

LOH2-V2 Praying with the Psalms- Praying the Liturgy of the Hours with Fr. Timothy Gallagher

HR17 – The Value of Listening and Silence – The Holy Rule of St. Benedict with Fr. Mauritius Wilde O.S.B

HR37 – Listening to the Word of God – The Holy Rule of St. Benedict with Fr. Mauritius Wilde O.S.B

 

Other Links:

IP#221 Dr. Scott Hahn – Consuming the Word on Inside the Pages with Kris McGregor

IP#54 Dr. Scott Hahn – Verbum Domini part 1 on Inside the Pages

IP#57 Dr. Scott Hahn – Verbum Domini part 2 on Inside the Pages

IP#49 Dr. Matthew Bunson – Pope Benedict – Verbum Domini part 1 on Inside the Pages

IP#52 Dr. Matthew Bunson – Pope Benedict’s Verbum Domini part 2 on Inside the Pages

 

Resources:

For the Liturgy of the Hours:  Universalis    and  iBrevary

From Vatican.va:

Dogmatic Constitution of Divine Revelation – DEI VERBUM

Constitution of the Sacred Liturgy – SACROSANCTUM CONCILIUM

 

Kris McGregor Founder and editor/producer/executive director of “Discerning Hearts ®. To learn more about Kris visit here

WM12 – Why Confirmation Matters pt. 2 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast

Catholic Spiritual Formation - Catholic Spiritual Direction 3

Episode 12  Why Confirmation Matters – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas

In this episode with Archbishop Lucas we continue the conversation about the action of the Holy Spirit and why the Sacrament of Confirmation matters?

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

1309 Preparation for Confirmation should aim at leading the Christian toward a more intimate union with Christ and a more lively familiarity with the Holy Spirit – his actions, his gifts, and his biddings – in order to be more capable of assuming the apostolic responsibilities of Christian life. To this end catechesis for Confirmation should strive to awaken a sense of belonging to the Church of Jesus Christ, the universal Church as well as the parish community. The latter bears special responsibility for the preparation of confirmands.127

1310 To receive Confirmation one must be in a state of grace. One should receive the sacrament of Penance in order to be cleansed for the gift of the Holy Spirit. More intense prayer should prepare one to receive the strength and graces of the Holy Spirit with docility and readiness to act.128

1316 Confirmation perfects Baptismal grace; it is the sacrament which gives the Holy Spirit in order to root us more deeply in the divine filiation, incorporate us more firmly into Christ, strengthen our bond with the Church, associate us more closely with her mission, and help us bear witness to the Christian faith in words accompanied by deeds.

1317 Confirmation, like Baptism, imprints a spiritual mark or indelible character on the Christian’s soul; for this reason one can receive this sacrament only once in one’s life.

For more episodes in this series visit the

Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast page

For more teachings and information about Archbishop George J. Lucas of the Archdiocese of Omaha, visit:   archomaha.org

RN-4 – Value # 4 – Truth and Freedom – Regnum Novum w/ Omar Gutierrez podcast

Value 4 Truth, Freedom, Justice, and Love part 1 “Truth and Freedom”

From episode … 4. Truth, Freedom, Justice, and Love part 1 “Truth and Freedom”

These are the four values of the Social Teaching of the Catholic Church as they’re enumerated in the Compendium and as they were laid out by, again, Blessed Pope John XXIII in Mater et Magistra and Pacem in Terris. Without these values, the work of social justice becomes an albatross around our necks. It pulls us down, threatening to poison all the work we do, no matter how well-intentioned.

When charity lacks truth, as Pope Benedict XVI states, it can be filled with every whim and agenda and becomes the opposite of itself. Truth is the truth of the fundamental dignity of the human person, a dignity we can only fully appreciate in the encounter with Christ.

A freedom that requires self-destruction is no freedom at all. Authentic freedom is the ability to do what is good, but this requires that we know the truth about the good.

(Justice and Love covered in proceeding episodes)

True social justice requires that we drop these paradigms of opposition: management vs. labor; bourgeois vs. proletariat; state vs. individual. We own the great Catholic both/and. It applies to the Social Teaching of the Catholic Church more than ever.

Deacon Omar F. A. Guiterrez, M.A., studied Theology at the Franciscan University of Steubenville and at the Angelicum in Rome. He holds a Master’s of Arts degree in Theology from the University of Dallas. He has worked for the Church in various capacities including as a teacher and administrator. His expertise includes Catholic Social Teaching, and his writings on the subject have appeared in several national Catholic newspapers and periodicals. He’s also the author of “The Urging of Christ’s Love:  The Saints and The Social Teaching of the Catholic”

Also visit Omar’s “Discerning Hearts” page Catholic Social Teaching 101  urging-of-christs-love

IJCY3 – Trust God – Is Jesus Calling You with Fr. Paul Hoesing Discerning Hearts podcast

 Fr. Paul Hoesing - Is Jesus Calling You? Discerning Your Vocational Call 3

Is Jesus Calling? A Spiritual Guide to Discerning Your Vocational Call with Fr. Paul Hoesing – episode 3

The Third Spiritual Lesson: Trust God. “When the thought of your vocation comes into your mind and heart, if you keep it to yourself in your mind, dwelling on it over and over trying to figure it out or trying to control it or  trying to get rid of it, then you will be choosing not to trust.”

Questions: Where are the particular classrooms in the general school of dependence where you are being invited to trust in God?  What are the storms in your life that make your mind race causing confusion in you?  Jesus wants do to something for you there. Focus him. Bring it to him. Desire his love in it.

Based on “Is Jesus Calling You To Be A Catholic Priest: A helpful guide”, published by National Conference of Diocesan Vocation Director.

Fr. Paul Hoesing serves at Kenrick-Glennon Seminary as Dean of Seminarians & Director of Human Formation

      

 

 

 

BKL11 – What it means to “put on Christ” – Building a Kingdom of Love w/ Msgr. John Esseff podcast

Msgr. Esseff reflects on St. Paul’s letter to the Ephesians Chapter 4 v. 20 -24:

22 Put off your old nature which belongs to your former manner of life and is corrupt through deceitful lusts, 23 and be renewed in the spirit of your minds, 24 and put on the new nature, created after the likeness of God in true righteousness and holiness. – RCVCE

Msgr. John A. Esseff is a Roman Catholic priest in the Diocese of Scranton. He was ordained on May 30th 1953, by the late Bishop William J. Hafey, D.D. at St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton, PA. Msgr. Esseff served a retreat director and confessor to St. Mother Teresa. He continues to offer direction and retreats for the sisters of the missionaries of charity around the world. Msgr. Esseff encountered St. Padre Pio, who would become a spiritual father to him. He has lived in areas around the world, serving in the Pontifical missions, a Catholic organization established by St. Pope John Paul II to bring the Good News to the world especially to the poor.  He continues to serve as a retreat leader and director to bishops, priests and sisters and seminarians and other religious leaders around the world.

 

BTP- L4 – Letter 162 – The Letters of St. Elizabeth of the Trinity – Beginning to Pray w/Dr. Anthony Lilles podcast

Dr. Lilles continues the spiritual explorations of the Letters of St. Elizabeth of the Trinity. In this episode, we discuss letter 162, with a special focus on the power of the liturgy and the grace that comes by living by faith as described below:

[April 28–30, 1903]
Dijon Carmel, April

J. M. + J. T.

My good little Aunts,
It seems to me that Carlipa and Dijon are very close, for my heart has quickly jumped the distance to go find yours! And my Divine Bridegroom gives me wings like this so I can fly off to you: these wings are prayer, and then this unity in faith and love creates the communion of saints! . . . I have many things to tell you, my little Aunts, but where to begin? Oh! if you knew how beautiful Holy Week is in Carmel! I wish you could have attended our beautiful Offices, and especially on our beautiful feast of Easter. On that day, we chant Matins at 3 o’clock in the morning, we enter the choir in procession, wearing our white mantles, each holding a candle and singing the Regina Coeli. At 5 o’clock, we have the Mass of the Resurrection, followed by a magnificent procession in our beautiful garden. Everything was so still, so mysterious, that it seemed our Master was going to appear to us along the solitary paths as He once did to Mary Magdalene, and if our eyes did not see Him, at least our souls met Him in faith. Faith is so good; it is Heaven in darkness, but one day the veil will be lifted and we will contemplate in His light Him whom we love; while awaiting the Bridegroom’s “Veni” we must spend ourselves, suffer for Him, and, above all, love Him greatly. Thank Him for having called your little Elizabeth to Carmel for the persecution;2 I do not know what awaits us, and this perspective of having to suffer because I am His delights my soul. I love my dear cloister so much, and sometimes I have wondered if I don’t love this dear little cell too much,3 where it is so good to be “alone with the Alone.”4 Perhaps one day He will ask me to sacrifice it. I am ready to follow Him everywhere, and my soul will say with Saint Paul: “Who will separate me from the love of Christ?”5 I have within me a solitude where He dwells, and nothing can take that away from me! . . .

Guite had the good idea of passing your dear photographs on to me. I introduced you to our Reverend Mother, since she has heard her little lamb,6 who loves you so much, speak about you for so long. I was also delighted to show her your dear house; what sweet memories it brings back to me. I spent so many wonderful vacations, certainly the best, there among you. And the Serre, is it still so beautiful? What fine prayers must be offered there! Would you tell Monsieur le Curé that I send him my soul to say the Office with him in that dear little valley, pay him my respects and ask him to pray much for me. He is so good, I am sure he would really want to remember me at his Mass. My little Aunts, if you knew how I love your beautiful breviaries! I can’t say it enough, and each time I use them, I take your souls with mine to enter into communion with all Heaven. I assure you that you have made me very happy; they follow me everywhere, and day and night my prayer for you is my “thank you”!

I am leaving you to go to Matins “with you.” I still have many things to tell you, but there’s the bell, so I only have time to kiss you, as well as my good Aunt, from the best of my heart.

Your little Elizabeth of the Trinity r.c.i.

Pray for my dear Mama. Events have really saddened her, but her courage edifies me and I thank Him who has given me such a good one. Hello to Anna.

Catez, Elizabeth of the Trinity. The Complete Works of Elizabeth of the Trinity volume 2: Letters from Carmel (pp. 101-102). ICS Publications. Kindle Edition.

Special thanks to Miriam Gutierrez for her readings of St. Elizabeth’s letters

For other episodes in the series visit
The Discerning Hearts “The Letters of St. Elizabeth of the Trinity” with Dr. Anthony Lilles’

Anthony Lilles, S.T.D. is an associate professor and the academic dean of Saint John’s Seminary in Camarillo as well as the academic advisor for Juan Diego House of Priestly Formation for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. For over twenty years he served the Church in Northern Colorado where he joined and eventually served as dean of the founding faculty of Saint John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver. Through the years, clergy, seminarians, religious and lay faithful have benefited from his lectures and retreat conferences on the Carmelite Doctors of the Church and the writings of St. Elisabeth of the Trinity.
"51ZjgQ+tcgL._SY344_BO1,204,203,2</p