A Litany of Saints – Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts

A Litany of Saints for the Discerning Heart


Teresa Monaghen…Pro Sanctity - The Universal Call to Holiness 1

In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.

Christ, have mercy. Christ, have mercy.

Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.

Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us.

Saint Michael, pray for us.
Saint Gabriel, pray for us.
Saint Raphael, pray for us.
All you holy Angels and Archangels, pray for us.

Saint Joseph, Protector of the Church, pray for us.

Saint John the Baptist, pray for us.

Saint Peter, pray for us.
Saint Paul, pray for us.
Saint Andrew, pray for us.
Saint James, pray for us.
Saint John, pray for us.
All you holy Apostles and Evangelists, pray for us.
All you holy Martyrs, pray for us.

Saint Stephen, pray for us.
Saint Lawrence, pray for us.
Saint Gregory, pray for us.
Saint Ambrose, pray for us.
Saint Augustine, pray for us.
Saint Nicholas, pray for us.
Saint Benedict, pray for us.
Saint Bernard, pray for us.
Saint Dominic, pray for us.
Saint Francis, pray for us.
All you holy Priests and Clergy, pray for us.
All you holy Monks and Hermits, pray for us.

Saint Mary Magdalene, pray for us.
Saints Perpetua and Felicity, pray for us.
Saint Agatha, pray for us.
Saint Lucy, pray for us.
Saint Agnes, pray for us.
Saint Cecilia, pray for us.
Saint Catherine of Alexandria, pray for us.
Saint Anastasia, pray for us.
Saint Clare, pray for us.
All you holy Virgins and Widows, pray for us.

Saint Hildegard of Bingen, pray for us.
Saint Thomas Aquinas, pray for us.
Saint Bridget of Sweden, pray for us
Saint Catherine of Siena, pray for us
Saint Ignatius of Loyola, pray for us.
Saint Teresa of Avila, pray for us.
Saint John of the Cross, pray for us.
Saint Francis de Sales, pray for us.
Saint Jane de Chantal, pray for us.

Saint Claude de La Colombière, pray for us.
Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque, pray for us.
Saint John Vianney, pray for us.
Saint John Henry Newman, pray for us
Saint Charbel Makhlouf, pray for us.

Saint Juan Diego, pray for us.
Saint Bernadette Soubirous, pray for us.
Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, pray for us.
Saint Elizabeth of the Trinity, pray for us.
Saint Gemma Gilgani, pray for us.

Saints Louis and Zélie Martin, pray for us.

Saint Fautina Kowalska, pray for us.
Saint Maximillian Mary Kolbe, pray for us.
Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, pray for us.
Saint Andrea Bessette, pray for us.
Saint Gianna Berretta Molla, pray for us.

Saint Pio of Pietrelcina, pray for us.
Saint Teresa of Calcutta, pray for us.
Saint John Paul II, pray for us.

Blessed Solanus Casey, pray for us.
Blessed Stanley Rother, pray for us.
Blessed Carlo Acutis, pray for us.
Venerable Bruno Lanteri, pray for us.
Venerable Fulton Sheen, pray for us.
Servant of God Leonie Martin, pray for us.
Servant of God Dorothy Day, pray for us.
Servant of God Catherine de Hueck Doherty, pray for us.
All you Holy Saints, Blesseds, and Servants of God, pray for us.

Lord, be merciful. Lord, deliver us, we pray.

From every evil, Lord, deliver us, we pray.
From every sin, Lord, deliver us, we pray.
From the snares of the devil, Lord, deliver us, we pray.
From disease, famine, and war, Lord, deliver us, we pray.
By your Incarnation, Lord, deliver us, we pray.
By your death and resurrection, Lord, deliver us, we pray.
By the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, Lord, deliver us, we pray.

Be merciful to us sinners, Lord, we ask you, hear our prayer.

Guide and protect your holy Church, Lord, we ask you, hear our prayer.

That You are continually taking care of me, Jesus, I trust in you.
That not knowing the future invites me to lean on You, Jesus, I trust in you.
That You are with me in my suffering, Jesus, I trust in you.
That my suffering, united to Your own,
will bear fruit in this life and the next, Jesus, I trust in you.
That You give me all the strength I need for what is asked, Jesus, I trust in you.
That my life is a gift, Jesus, I trust in you.
That You are my Lord and my God, Jesus, I trust in you.
That I am Your beloved one, Jesus, I trust in you.

Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world, spare us, Lord.
Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world, graciously hear us.
Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.

Christ, hear us. Christ, hear us.
Lord Jesus, hear our prayer. Lord Jesus, hear our prayer.
Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy. Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.

Amen.

 

St. Elizabeth of the Trinity Novena Day 2 – Discerning Hearts Podcast


 Day Two – For the grace to give our hearts to Jesus

Saint Elizabeth wants us to give our heart to Jesus, to enter into a prayer so deep and beautiful, that we hear Him ask for it.   She invites us to hear the Word of the Father speak to our souls the way the Samaritan Woman heard Christ speak to hers.  Our Lord wants adorers “in spirit and truth.”

For Saint Elizabeth, Jesus is the great Adorer, and he wants us to become what He is. When we look at how He adored the Father, we see that his prayer was not a good intention or a nice wish, but a lived reality.  What Christ offered to the Father in the silence of prayer, He gave up on the Cross for our sake.  His whole existence became an act of worship and spiritual sacrifice.

This means that to be an adorer in “truth,” we must also live out the truth in our actions.  We must give Jesus the gift of our hearts not only in our words and intentions but our actions as well. Here, however, our weaknesses seem to hinder us.  The truth is that God loves us, and He does so, even in the face of our sins. Christ-crucified lived in the love of the Father, even as He took on the consequences of our sins to show us that God’s love is greater than sin.  Everything for Jesus was done out of love for the Father. For us to be adorers in truth, we must, like Christ, live in God’s love – until every decision, every action is carried out in that love, by that love, and for that love.  Even in the midst of difficult trials, our actions must be Christ-like – just as Jesus Christ lived by complete confidence in the Father, we must live in complete confidence in Him.

How do we acquire this is childlike posture before the Lord? Saint Elizabeth wants to help us spend time in the silence of prayer.  Trying to stay in this silence is difficult.  We must face our tendencies to brood over injuries or else simply not deal with the interior pain that we carry.  Silence wasted on such interior rancor is dangerous. Saint Elizabeth describes another kind of silence, and it this silence that we must seek in prayer by renouncing every thought or feeling or fantasy that is not worthy of it.  Each renunciation deepens childlike confidence and trust. The greater this trust, the deeper the silence God guides us into. She describes this silence as allowing the Lord to sit us on His knee and caress us like a mother comforts her child —  an image from Isaiah.  Throughout the trials and difficulties in life, the silent and tender love of God surrounds us and is completely present to us.  This is the same love that gave Christ the strength to die for us. Now the Trinity gently offers it to strengthen us, too.  In the silence of prayer, we can hear and respond to God’s gentle invitation, “Give me your heart.”

The spiritual mission of Saint Elizabeth is to keep us in the deep silence in which we can hear this tender voice.  So that she might help us give our hearts in the stillness of this immense love, let us pray:

O My God, Trinity whom I adore, help me to forget myself entirely so as to be established in you as still and as peaceful as if my soul were already in eternity. May nothing be able to disturb my peace, nor make me depart from you, o my Unchanging One, but may each moment carry me further into the depths of your Mystery. Pacify my soul, make it your heaven, your beloved abode, your resting place. May I never leave you there alone, but may I be entirely present, my faith completely ready, wholly adoring, fully surrendered to your creative action.

O my beloved Christ, crucified by love, I would like to be a bride for your heart. I would like to cover you with glory, I would like to love you… unto death. I feel my powerlessness, however, and I ask you to clothe me with yourself, to identify my soul with all the movements of your soul, to defeat me, to overwhelm me, to substitute yourself for me, that my life might be but the radiation of your Life. Come into me as Adorer, as Healer, as Savior. O Eternal Word, Word of my God, I want to spend my life listening to you, I want to be completely docile, ready to learn everything from you. Then, through all nights, all voids, all weakness, I want to fixate on you always and to remain under your great light. O My beloved Star, fascinate me so that I would not be able to forsake your shining light.

O Consuming Flame, Spirit of love, come over me until my soul is render into an incarnation of the Word; may I be for Him another humanity in which he renews His whole Mystery.

And you, O Father, bend over your little creature, cover her with your shadow, and see in her only the Beloved in whom You are well-pleased.
O my Three, my All, my Beatitude, Infinite Solitude, Immensity in which I loose myself, I surrender myself as prey. Bury yourself in me in order that I might bury myself in you, while waiting to contemplate in your light the immeasurable depths of your grandeur.

Amen

The Novena to St. Elizabeth of the Trinity is authored by Dr. Anthony Lilles S.T.D.

For the entire 9-Day Novena to St. Elizabeth of the Trinity

St. Elizabeth of the Trinity Novena Day 1 – Mp3 audio and Text

Dr. Anthony Lilles STD - Beginning to Pray 3
 Day One – For the grace to enter into great silence

In this nine days of prayer with Saint Elizabeth of the Trinity, we will offer her oblation to the Trinity, “O My God whom I adore. “ Elizabeth wrote this prayer to help souls seek a spiritually mature relationship with God. This journey to spiritual maturity progresses by way of silence, an interior silence. This is not an empty silence or an alienated one. It is a silence that is vigilant for the new work that the Holy Trinity is waiting to do in us. On this first day of this Novena, let us begin by recalling Saint Elizabeth’s mission – a mission completely oriented to the powerful silence in which the soul encounters the fullness of God. She writes, shortly before her death:

I suppose that in heaven my mission will be to attract souls
Helping them go out of themselves
To cleave to God by a entirely simple and loving movement
And to keep them inside this great silence
That will allow God to imprint Himself in them
And transform them into Himself. L 335

That this mission might be realized in us, and that we might enter into great silence, and through Saint Elizabeth’s intercession, remain there, let us pray:

O My God, Trinity whom I adore, help me to forget myself entirely so as to be established in you as still and as peaceful as if my soul were already in eternity. May nothing be able to disturb my peace, nor make me depart from you, o my Unchanging One, but may each moment carry me further into the depths of your Mystery. Pacify my soul, make it your heaven, your beloved abode, your resting place. May I never leave you there alone, but may I be entirely present, my faith completely ready, wholly adoring, fully surrendered to your creative action.

O my beloved Christ, crucified by love, I would like to be a bride for your heart. I would like to cover you with glory, I would like to love you… unto death. I feel my powerlessness, however, and I ask you to clothe me with yourself, to identify my soul with all the movements of your soul, to defeat me, to overwhelm me, to substitute yourself for me, that my life might be but the radiation of your Life. Come into me as Adorer, as Healer, as Savior. O Eternal Word, Word of my God, I want to spend my life listening to you, I want to be completely docile, ready to learn everything from you. Then, through all nights, all voids, all weakness, I want to fixate on you always and to remain under your great light. O My beloved Star, fascinate me so that I would not be able to forsake your shining light.

O Consuming Flame, Spirit of love, come over me until my soul is render into an incarnation of the Word; may I be for Him another humanity in which he renews His whole Mystery.

And you, O Father, bend over your little creature, cover her with your shadow, and see in her only the Beloved in whom You are well-pleased.
O my Three, my All, my Beatitude, Infinite Solitude, Immensity in which I loose myself, I surrender myself as prey. Bury yourself in me in order that I might bury myself in you, while waiting to contemplate in your light the immeasurable depths of your grandeur.

Amen

The Novena to St. Elizabeth of the Trinity is authored by Dr. Anthony Lilles S.T.D.

For the entire 9-Day Novena to St. Elizabeth of the Trinity

IP#359 Dr. Scott Hahn – Hope to Die on Inside the Pages with Kris McGregor Podcast


What a delight to have the opportunity to have a conversation with Dr. Scott Hahn about his fantastic new book Hope to Die: The Christian Meaning of Death and the Resurrection of the Body.  Along with Emily Stimpson Chapman, Dr. Hahn brings us an absorbing work that reflects the transcendent nature of our souls and also of our bodies.  He helps us to go deeper into the mystery of the incarnation, as well as, the sheer gift of our own existence in God’s eyes.  Joy and expectation fuel an effervescent hope that we definitely all need today.  So filled with spiritual fruit, you do not want to miss this incredible book!

You can find the book here

From the book description:

As Catholics, we believe in the resurrection of the body. We profess it in our creed. We’re taught that to bury and pray for the dead are corporal and spiritual works of mercy. We honor the dead in our Liturgy through the Rite of Christian burial. We do all of this, and more, because when Jesus Christ took on flesh for the salvation of our souls he also bestowed great dignity on our bodies.

In Hope to Die: The Christian Meaning of Death and the Resurrection of the Body, Scott Hahn explores the significance of death and burial from a Catholic perspective. The promise of the bodily resurrection brings into focus the need for the dignified care of our bodies at the hour of death. Unpacking both Scripture and Catholic teaching, Hope to Die reminds us that we are destined for glorification on the last day.

Our bodies have been made by a God who loves us. Even in death, those bodies point to the mystery of our salvation.

 

Episode 10 – In Defense of Sanity – Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J., Vivian Dudro, and Joseph Pearce FBC Podcast


Why “vulgar” can be good—and much more, as we continue to discuss essays by G.K. Chesterton from the collection In Defense of Sanity.

This discussion is part of the FORMED Book Club—an online community led by Fr. Joseph Fessio, Joseph Pearce, and Vivian Dudro that reads and discusses a different book each month.


You can find the book here

G.K. Chesterton was a master essayist. But reading his essays is not just an exercise in studying a literary form at its finest, it is an encounter with timeless truths that jump off the page as fresh and powerful as the day they were written. The only problem with Chesterton’s essays is that there are too many of them. Over five thousand!

For most GKC readers it is not even possible to know where to start or how to begin to approach them.  So three of the world’s leading authorities on Chesterton – Dale Ahlquist, Joseph Pearce, Aidan Mackey – have joined together to select the best Chesterton essays, a collection that will be appreciated by both the newcomer and the seasoned student of this great 20th-century man of letters.

The variety of topics are astounding: barbarians, architects, mystics, ghosts, fireworks, rain, juries, gargoyles, and much more. Plus a look at Shakespeare, Dickens, Jane Austen, George MacDonald, T.S. Eliot, and the Bible. All in that inimitable, formidable but always quotable style of GKC. Even more astounding than the variety is the continuity of Chesterton’s thought that ties everything together.

A veritable feast for the mind and heart. While some of the essays in this volume may be familiar, many of them are collected here for the first time, making their first appearance in over a century.


Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J.
Vivian Dudro
Joseph Pearce

 

SP14 – St. John Henry Cardinal Newman, Pray for Us – In Search of the Still Point with Dr. Regis Martin – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Episode 14 – St. John Henry Cardinal Newman, Pray for Us

Dr. Regis Martin

Discerning Hearts is honored to host the reflections of Dr. Regis Martin.  Filled with profound insights, wisdom, and joy, he is one of the most trustworthy guides one can have on the spiritual journey.

For years Regis Martin, STD, has been regaling audiences about the mysteries of God and Church, most especially his students at Franciscan University of Steubenville where he teaches theology. Author of half-dozen or more books, including The Suffering of Love (Ignatius, 2006), The Last Things (Ignatius Press, 2011), Still Point (Ave Maria, 2012), The Beggar’s Banquet (Emmaus Road, 2012), Witness to Wonder (Emmaus Road, 2017) his work frequently appears in Crises and The Catholic Thing.

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FA9 – Body and Soul at Rest – Freedom from Anxiety with Sonja Corbitt – Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts

Body and Soul at Rest – Episode 9 – Freedom from Anxiety with Sonja Corbitt

Rest is not merely inactivity. Although it certainly includes leisure, rest involves the entire human person, in thoughts, emotions, body, and soul. In this episode we explore what the Bible means when it commands us to observe Sabbath rest.

For other episodes in this series, visit the Discerning Hearts Sonja Corbitt page

Be sure to visit Bible StudyEvangelista webpage at: https://www.biblestudyevangelista.com


LOVE the Word™ is a Bible study method based on Mary’s own practice.

Listen (Receive the Word.)

O | Observe (Connect the passage to your life and recent events.)

Could a neglect of keeping a proper Sunday observance be contributing to your unrest? What small steps can you begin taking today to make your Sundays more restful for yourself and your family?

V | Verbalize (Pray about your thoughts and emotions.)

Remembering that He loves you and that you are in His presence, talk to God about the particulars of your O – Observe step. You may want to write your reflections in your LOVE the Word® journal. Or, get a free journal page and guide in the right-hand margin.

E | Entrust (May it be done to me according to your word!)

Heavenly Father, I ask that Your love flow upon me. May the Blood of Christ cover all wounds and restore all in me to wholeness and life. May the fire from Our Lady’s heart now enter me and anoint everything with the Holy Spirit and blind Satan. May St. Joseph wrap me with blessings and peace, in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen

READ THE TRANSCRIPT

Click here for a written transcript of this episode.   


Visit here for more on Sonja’s “LOVE the Word” journal

Also:


Chapter 13: Preparing for Action – Actio – How to Pray with David Torkington – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Chapter 13 – Preparing for Action – Actio

“As you did it to one of the least of these my brethren, you did it to me.” – Jesus Christ, Matthew 25:40

We will not ultimately be judged by the wonderful feelings we have experienced in prayer, how many ecstasies we have had or even how many miracles we have worked or people we have healed, but how we have served God in the neighbor in need.


You can find the book here.

This little book How to Pray – A Practical Guide to the Spiritual life by David Torkington, was published by Our Sunday Visitor. It was written for those prepared to restructure their daily lives to make time for the prayer where they can be transformed by the love that only God can give.

In the foreword to this new book from OSV, “How to Pray: A Practical Guide to the Spiritual Life,” Sister Wendy Beckett wrote,

“There are no hideaways here, no excuses, but no alarming demands, either. Instead, Torkington seeks only to show us the truth, that truth that sets us free and convinces us that the yoke of Jesus is easy and his burden light. All we need is to understand and to choose. This book offers us the help we need to understand, and then the choice is ours.”⁠

This is not your standard “prayer book” – it is not a compilation of Catholic prayers for you to just read. Rather, this is a series of 40 reflections on prayer intended to open you up to the transformation that is possible through prayer, through the love that God can give us through prayer.⁠


Endorsement

“From here to eternity! For those drawn to contemplative prayer, David Torkington offers compelling clarity and common sense. Gentle kindness guides his practical counsel, and he is careful to help us see the solid principles in which he roots his insights. An authentic and reliable guard against counterfeits, his wisdom points to the heights and grounded-ness of the Catholic mystical tradition at a time when it is most needed.”

Dr. Anthony Lilles, STD: Associate Professor and Academic Dean of St John’s Seminary in Camarillo, as well as the academic advisor for Juan Diego House of Priestly Formation for the diocese of Los Angeles. For over twenty years, he served the Church in Northern Colorado, where he joined and eventually served as dean of the founding faculty of Saint John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver.


Visit his website:  www.davidtorkington.com.

The author of the popular Peter Calvay series, his books include Wisdom from the Western Isles, Wisdom from Franciscan Italy, Wisdom from the Christian Mystics, Prayer Made Simple (CTS), and How to Pray by Our Sunday Visitor. His books have been translated into 13 different languages.

 

BTP-WE1 – Self-discovery and Gift of Self – Beginning to Pray: Words of Encouragement for Spiritual Pilgrims w/Dr. Anthony Lilles Podcast

In this episode of Beginning to Pray: Words of Encouragement for Spiritual Pilgrims, Dr. Lilles reflects on

Self-discovery and Gift of Self – the Truth Christ Reveals

John Paul II sincerely believed that we are so created that we can only discover the truth about ourselves when we give ourselves to another.  He believed this from his own experience. He marveled how it was possible to meet someone and be so overwhelmed by their beauty that you should want to sacrifice everything for their sake, that this other person might thrive. In this he glimpsed not only the beauty of God’s plan for man and woman in marriage, but also the beauty of Christ’s love for each and every soul.

St. John Paul II

The communion Christ has come to share surpasses the fulfillment and mutual possession meant to be ours in the institution of marriage. When we see His beauty, we realize that the deepest joys shared in the marriage of man and woman only foreshadow a more wonderful communion that is to come.

Before the Beauty of His Face, even the sorrows and disappointments that we bear in our families, no matter how crushing, take on a new perspective. He who was abandoned and betrayed captivates us in His radiance even as we struggle with humiliation and resentment. Those who we thought we could never forgive, we find the courage to forgive whenever we glimpse Him gazing on us in love.

His beauty, the beauty of a love that holds nothing back, evokes a response from the deepest part of our being. For when our eyes are opened by faith in Him, we are moved to believe at once that Christ has perceived our beauty before the dawn of creation — and in perceiving it, brought it into being and offered His life in sacrifice for it, that each soul that believes in Him might know a greatness far beyond its power to surmise.

The Son who forever rejoices in the sheer goodness of His Father, rejoiced anew to make this known to all creation. He chose to do this through friendship with each of us – so that each of us participate in the revelation of glory the Father has given to His Son. This friendship and participation is nothing less than a dwelling in his presence – by faith in this life, and glory in the next. For this purpose and out of nothing, the Word of the Father summoned a beauty so deep in the human heart that, even when the human heart is diminished by sin, He has already resolved to sacrifice everything in order that all that is good, noble and true in it might not perish.

Nothing forces his loving sacrifice save the divine predilection for humble humanity that lives deep in the mystery of the Holy Trinity. The Father is drawn by our plight to speak His Word into our difficult  personal circumstances. With His Word, He breathes His Holy Spirit into us that we should have hope and thrive. In the power of the Holy Spirit, Christ journeys across the vast horizons of our hearts “like a Bridegroom coming from his tent, a champion running his course.” For what He finds most beautiful in us is that we are in His own image and likeness — creatures who are meant to mirror in time the love that He offers without reserve to the Father from eternity.

The work of redemption that He wrought on the Cross is about bringing to completion this intimate and faithful communion of sacrificial love for which we were created. He reveals the beauty of an unimpeded love on the Cross to capture our hearts so that we might finally be able to love without impediment. Though such a love seems so far beyond our limitations and sins, He offered his sacrifice for our sake in a way that allows us to participate in what He has done — and, in this, we become what we are meant to be: living sacrifices of love, the praise of His glory.

For more writings of encouragement visit Dr. Lilles’ “Beginning to Pray” blog

Anthony Lilles, S.T.D. is an associate professor and the academic dean of St. Patrick Seminary in Menlo Park, CA as well as the founder/director of the St. John Paul Institute for Contemplative Culture. For over twenty years he served the Church in Northern Colorado where he joined and eventually served as dean of the founding faculty of Saint John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver. Through the years, clergy, seminarians, religious and lay faithful have benefited from his lectures and retreat conferences on the Carmelite Doctors of the Church and the writings of St. Elisabeth of the Trinity.

 

SP13 – Given and Forgiven – In Search of the Still Point with Dr. Regis Martin – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Episode 13 – Given and Forgiven

Dr. Regis Martin

Discerning Hearts is honored to host the reflections of Dr. Regis Martin.  Filled with profound insights, wisdom, and joy, he is one of the most trustworthy guides one can have on the spiritual journey.

For years Regis Martin, STD, has been regaling audiences about the mysteries of God and Church, most especially his students at Franciscan University of Steubenville where he teaches theology. Author of half-dozen or more books, including The Suffering of Love (Ignatius, 2006), The Last Things (Ignatius Press, 2011), Still Point (Ave Maria, 2012), The Beggar’s Banquet (Emmaus Road, 2012), Witness to Wonder (Emmaus Road, 2017) his work frequently appears in Crises and The Catholic Thing.

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