Come, Holy Spirit

Come, Holy Spirit,
Veni, Sancte Spiritus,

fill the hearts of Thy faithful
reple tuorum corda fidelium

and enkindle in them the fire of Thy love
et tui amoris in eis ignem accende

Send forth Thy Spirit
Emitte Spiritum tuum,

and they shall be created.
Emitte Spiritum tuum, et creabuntur.

And Thou shalt renew the face of the earth.
Et renovabis faciem terrae.

Let us pray.
Oremus.

O God, Who didst instruct the hearts of the faithful by the light of the Holy Spirit:
Deus, qui corda fidelium Sancti Spiritus illustratione docuisti:

grant us in the same Spirit to be truly wise;
da nobis in eodem Spiritu recta sapere;

and ever to rejoice in His consolation.
et de eius semper consolatione gaudere.

Through Christ our Lord.
Per Christum Dominum nostrum.

Amen.

Pentecost2

Come, Holy Spirit – Discerning Hearts

Come, Holy Spirit,
Veni, Sancte Spiritus,

fill the hearts of Thy faithful
reple tuorum corda fidelium

and enkindle in them the fire of Thy love
et tui amoris in eis ignem accende

Send forth Thy Spirit
Emitte Spiritum tuum,

and they shall be created.
Emitte Spiritum tuum, et creabuntur.

And Thou shalt renew the face of the earth.
Et renovabis faciem terrae.

Let us pray.
Oremus.

O God, Who didst instruct the hearts of the faithful by the light of the Holy Spirit:
Deus, qui corda fidelium Sancti Spiritus illustratione docuisti:

grant us in the same Spirit to be truly wise;
da nobis in eodem Spiritu recta sapere;

and ever to rejoice in His consolation.
et de eius semper consolatione gaudere.

Through Christ our Lord.
Per Christum Dominum nostrum.

Amen.

Pentecost2

BKL35 – The Great Gift of Penetcost with Msgr. John Esseff

Msgr. John Esseff

Msgr. Esseff reflects on the readings for the great feast of Pentecost  He discusses the  birth of our true identity, and in particular, what it means to be Christ in the world today.

From the NAB

ROM 8:8-17

Brothers and sisters:
Those who are in the flesh cannot please God.
But you are not in the flesh;
on the contrary, you are in the spirit,
if only the Spirit of God dwells in you.
Whoever does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him.
But if Christ is in you,
although the body is dead because of sin,
the spirit is alive because of righteousness.
If the Spirit of the one who raised Jesus from the dead dwells in you, Pentecost-22
the one who raised Christ from the dead
will give life to your mortal bodies also,
through his Spirit that dwells in you.
Consequently, brothers and sisters,
we are not debtors to the flesh,
to live according to the flesh.
For if you live according to the flesh, you will die,
but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body,
you will live.

For those who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God.
For you did not receive a spirit of slavery to fall back into fear,
but you received a Spirit of adoption,
through whom we cry, “Abba, Father!”
The Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit
that we are children of God,
and if children, then heirs,
heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ,
if only we suffer with him
so that we may also be glorified with him.

Msgr. John A. Esseff is a Roman Catholic priest in the Diocese of Scranton.  He was ordained on May 30th 1953, by the late Bishop William J. Hafey, D.D. at St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton, PA.  Msgr. Esseff served a retreat director and confessor to Blessed Mother Teresa.    He continues to offer direction and retreats for the sisters of the missionaries of charity around the world.  Msgr. Esseff encountered St.  Padre Pio,  who would become a spiritual father to him.  He has lived in areas around the world,  serving  in the Pontifical missions, a Catholic organization established by Bl. Pope John Paul II to bring the Good News to the world especially to the poor.  Msgr. Esseff assisted the founders of the Institute for Priestly Formation and continues to serve as a spiritual director for the Institute.  He continues to  serve as a retreat leader and director to bishops, priests and sisters and seminarians and other religious leaders around the world.   

 

 

To obtain a copy of Msgr. Esseff’s book by visiting here

 

Be sure to visit Msgr. Esseff’s website “Building a Kingdom of  Love

 

Holy Spirit, Make Your Home In Me – In Conversation with Fr. George Montague

Fr. George Montague is an exceptional biblical scholar, as well as a humble pastor.  His experience with the gifts given by the Holy Spirit are extraordinary and he shares those with us, but he also encourages us to seek the deepening of our own prayer lives so that we too may discover what the Father desires to give his beloved children. Through Scripture and the practice  of prayer, Fr. Montague helps to encounter the Holy Spirit who is eager for our response.  Bruce and I loved our conversation with him. Highly recommended!!

Holy Spirit Make Your Home In Me

You can buy this book here

IP#216 Russell Shaw – American Church on Inside the Pages

“Americanization ” is a very important concept to comprehend when trying to understand the state of the Roman Catholic Church in America. In “American Russell-ShawChurch: The Remarkable Rise, Meteoric Fall, and Uncertain Future of Catholicism in America”  offers that many of the benefits of cultural assimilation exprienced by Catholic immigrants to the U.S.,  around the turn of the last century, were good.  However, the secular culture has threatened the “Catholic identity” of millions of faithful and of their institutions, such as schools, universities, and hospitals.

Rich in in history, which points potentially to the future, Russell Shaw helps us to see the disturbing aspects of the Church in America today, while offering hopeful outcomes for the future.  A very important book, indeed!

American-ChurchYou can find the book here

“Russell Shaw is one of the best informed and most articulate observers of the American Catholic experience; a writer of elegant clarity, fairness and impeccable research. If you want to understand the Church in the United States and the challenges she now faces, American Church should be on the short list of books you need to read.”
+Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., Archbishop of Philadelphia

“The new bull-in-the-china-shop of U.S. Catholic history, Russell Shaw upends pedestals, reimagines story-lines, and invites all of us to think again about the roots of the severe challenges — and great opportunities — facing the Church in the United States in the first decades of the third millennium.” —-George Weigel, author of Evangelical Catholicism: Deep Reform in the 21st-Century Church

 

St. Damian of Molokai, apostle of the exiled w/ Dr. Matthew Bunson

Dr Matthew Bunson co-wrote, with Margaret Bunson, a compelling biography of St. Damien.  
Dr. Bunson took time to share many more aspects of the life of this incredible saint.

 

St Jozef Damien De Veuster (1840-1889) – from vatican.va

St Jozef Damien De Veuster, ss.cc, was born at Tremelo, Belgium, on 3 January 1840 (see also p. 8). Jozef (“Jef”) began his novitiate with the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary (“Picpus Fathers”) at the beginning of 1859 and took the name Damien. He would pray every day before a picture of St Francis

Xavier, patron of missionaries, to be sent on a mission. In 1863 his brother, who was to leave for a mission in the Hawaiian Islands, fell ill. Since preparations for the voyage had already been made, Damien obtained permission from the Superior General to take his brother’s place. He landed in Honolulu on 19 March 1864. He was ordained to the priesthood on the following 21 May.

At that time, the Hawaiian Government decided on the harsh measure of quarantine aimed at preventing the spread of leprosy: the deportation to the neighbouring Island of Molokai of all those infected by what was then thought to be an incurable disease. The entire mission was concerned about the abandoned lepers and Bishop Louis Maigret, a Picpus father, felt sure they needed priests. He did not want to send anyone “in the name of obedience” because he was aware such an assignment was a potential death sentence. Of the four brothers who volunteered, Damien was the first to leave on 10 May 1873 for Kalaupapa.

At his own request and that of the lepers, he remained on Molokai. Having contracted leprosy himself, he died on 15 April 1889, at the age of 49, after serving 16 years among the lepers. He was buried in the local cemetery under the same Pandanus tree where he had first slept upon his arrival in Molokai. His remains were exhumed in 1936 at the request of the Belgian Government and translated to a crypt of the Church of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts at Louvain. Damien is universally known for having freely shared the life of the lepers in quarantine on the Kalaupapa Peninsula of Molokai. His departure for the “cursed isle”, the announcement of his illness (leprosy) in 1884 and his subsequent death deeply impressed his contemporaries of all denominations.

Damien was above all a Catholic missionary. Fr Damien is known today as a hero of charity because he identified so closely with thevictims of leprosy.

He respected the religious convictions of others; he accepted them as people and received with joy their collaboration and their help. With a heart wide open to the most abject and wretched, he showed no difference in his approach and in his care of the lepers. In his parish ministry or in his works of charity he found a place for everyone.

He continues to inspire thousands of believers and non-believers who wish to imitate him and to discover the source of his heroism. People of all creeds and all philosophical systems recognized in him the Servant of God which he always revealed himself to be, and respect his passion for the salvation of souls.

Pope John Paul II beatified Damien de Veuster in Brussels on 4 June 1995.

St. Athanasius – Father and Doctor of the Church w/Mike Aquilina – Discerning Hearts

St. Athanasius is one of the great Father and Doctors of the Church…the Father of Orthodoxy. His extraordinary life is shared with us by Mike Aquilina. When we say “consubstantial” at mass it’s due in part to St. Athansius and the battle against the Arian Heresy. Take a listen and learn more…mikeaquilina-1


More on the life of St. Athanasius from Pope Benedict at Vatican.va

GENERAL AUDIENCE

Paul VI Audience Hall
Wednesday, 20 June 2007

Continuing our revisitation of the great Teachers of the ancient Church, let us focus our attention today on St Athanasius of Alexandria.
>Only a few years after his death, this authentic protagonist of the Christian tradition was already hailed as “the pillar of the Church” by Gregory of Nazianzus, the great theologian and Bishop of Constantinople (Orationes, 21, 26), and he has always been considered a model of orthodoxy in both East and West.

As a result, it was not by chance that Gian Lorenzo Bernini placed his statue among those of the four holy Doctors of the Eastern and Western Churches – together with the images of Ambrose, John Chrysostom and Augustine – which surround the Chair of St Peter in the marvellous apse of the Vatican Basilica.

Athanasius was undoubtedly one of the most important and revered early Church Fathers. But this great Saint was above all the impassioned theologian of the Incarnation of the Logos, the Word of God who – as the Prologue of the fourth Gospel says – “became flesh and dwelt among us” (Jn 1: 14).

For this very reason Athanasius was also the most important and tenacious adversary of the Arian heresy, which at that time threatened faith in Christ, reduced to a creature “halfway” between God and man, according to a recurring tendency in history which we also see manifested today in various forms.

In all likelihood Athanasius was born in Alexandria, Egypt, in about the year 300 A.D. He received a good education before becoming a deacon and secretary to the Bishop of Alexandria, the great Egyptian metropolis. As a close collaborator of his Bishop, the young cleric took part with him in the Council of Nicaea, the first Ecumenical Council, convoked by the Emperor Constantine in May 325 A.D. to ensure Church unity. The Nicene Fathers were thus able to address various issues and primarily the serious problem that had arisen a few years earlier from the preaching of the Alexandrian priest, Arius.

With his theory, Arius threatened authentic faith in Christ, declaring that the Logos was not a true God but a created God, a creature “halfway” between God and man who hence remained for ever inaccessible to us. The Bishops gathered in Nicaea responded by developing and establishing the “Symbol of faith” [“Creed”] which, completed later at the First Council of Constantinople, has endured in the traditions of various Christian denominations and in the liturgy as the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed.

In this fundamental text – which expresses the faith of the undivided Church and which we also recite today, every Sunday, in the Eucharistic celebration – the Greek term homooúsiosis featured, in Latin consubstantialis: it means that the Son, the Logos, is “of the same substance” as the Father, he is God of God, he is his substance. Thus, the full divinity of the Son, which was denied by the Arians, was brought into the limelight.

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