IP#317 Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J. – Robert Cardinal Sarah’s “The Power of Silence” on Inside the Pages

Fr. Joseph Fessio, founder and editor-in-chief of Ignatius Press discusses one of the most important books of our time,  “The Power of Silence: Against the Dictatorship of Noise” by Robert Cardinal Sarah.

 

You can find the book here

From the book description:

In a time when technology penetrates our lives in so many ways and materialism exerts such a powerful influence over us, Cardinal Robert Sarah presents a bold book about the strength of silence. The modern world generates so much noise, he says, that seeking moments of silence has become both harder and more necessary than ever before.

Silence is the indispensable doorway to the divine, explains the cardinal in this profound conversation with Nicolas Diat. Within the hushed and hallowed walls of the La Grande Chartreux, the famous Carthusian monastery in the French Alps, Cardinal Sarah addresses the following questions: Can those who do not know silence ever attain truth, beauty, or love? Do not wisdom, artistic vision, and devotion spring from silence, where the voice of God is heard in the depths of the human heart?

After the international success of God or Nothing, Cardinal Sarah seeks to restore to silence its place of honor and importance. “Silence is more important than any other human work,” he says, “for it expresses God. The true revolution comes from silence; it leads us toward God and others so as to place ourselves humbly and generously at their service.”

Cardinal Sarah

“This book shows Cardinal Sarah to be one of the most spiritually alert churchmen of our time.”
–Bishop Robert Barron, Creator and Host, Catholicism film series

Cardinal Robert Sarah’s profound exploration of the silence in which we hear the still, quiet voice of God, and thus come to know the truth about ourselves, is a powerful challenge to the cacophony of our times and a summons to a more Gospel-centered way of life.”
–George Weigel, Distinguished Senior Fellow and William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies, Ethics and Public Policy Center

 

Holy Is His Name – Mary’s Magnificat, Word by Word with Sonja Corbitt

The Name of the Lord is salvation, so that Jesus can promise, “anything you ask in my Name, I will do it” (Jn 14:13-14).

The third commandment, “You shall not take the Name of the Lord God in vain,” is most often applied to cursing or similar abuse of His name, but in the Scriptures “vanity” is consistently used to illustrate worthlessness, emptiness, or futility (see Ecclesiastes). Therefore, rather than something we necessarily do, it is more often something we don’t do.

When we neglect to call on the Name of the Lord when we need help (salvation), we have taken His name in vain. His name lies empty for us. We do not know it or experience it, and so we render it worthless in our lives. This is the fullness of what it means to “take the Name of the Lord in vain.”

For other episodes in this series, visit the Discerning Hearts Sonja Corbitt page

Scripture References for The Show

Luke 1:46-55, the words of the Magnificat

And Mary said:
“My soul magnifies the Lord,
47 and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior,
48 for he has regarded the low estate of his handmaiden.
For behold, henceforth all generations will call me blessed;
49 for he who is mighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his name.
50 And his mercy is on those who fear him
from generation to generation.
51 He has shown strength with his arm,
he has scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts,
52 he has put down the mighty from their thrones,
and exalted those of low degree;
53 he has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent empty away.
54 He has helped his servant Israel,
in remembrance of his mercy,
55 as he spoke to our fathers,
to Abraham and to his posterity for ever.”

“Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with you. Blessed are you among women,” (Luke 1:28), the angel to Mary.

“Blessed is the fruit of your womb” (Luke 1:42), Elizabeth to Mary

“Holy Mary,” (Luke 1:48), blessed = beatified, holy

“Mother of my Lord,” (Luke 1:48), Elizabeth

Episode Resources

Isaiah 7:14, 9:6, Wonderful Counselor, Almighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace

Proverbs 18:10, The Name of the Lord is strong tower.

Judges 13, Manoah and his wife see the angel of the Lord. “So Manoah arose and followed his wife. When he came to the Man, he said to Him, ‘Are You the Man who spoke to this woman?’ And He said, ‘I am’” (Judg. 13:11). “Why askest thou thus after my name, seeing is secret?” (13:18). “secret, too wonderful, mysterious”

Exodus 3:14-15, God reveals His Name to humanity.

Exodus 34:5, God reveals His “glory” to Moses in the cleft of the Rock, and His “glory” is His Name.

List of some of the “names” God’s people gave Him throughout the scriptures:

  •  Jehovah-Nissi (Ex. 17:15)                              The-Lord-My-Banner (flag)
  •  Jehovah-Raah (Ps. 23:1)                                The-Lord-My-Shepherd
  •  Jehovah-Jireh (Gen. 22:14)                           The-Lord-Will-Provide
  •  Jehovah-Rapha (Ex.15: 26)                           The-Lord-That-Healeth
  •  Jehovah-Shalom (Judg. 6:24)                       The-Lord-Is-Peace
  •  Jehovah-Shamma (Ez. 48:35)                        The-Lord-Is-There
  •  Jehovah-Sabaoth (1 Sam. 1:3)                        The-Lord-Of-Hosts (armies)
  •  Jehovah-Tsidkenu (Jer. 23:6)                        The-Lord-Our-Righteousness
  •  Jehovah-Oz (Is. 12:2)                                       The-Lord-My-Strength
  •  YAH (Ps. 68:4; poetic form of Yahweh)       The-Lord-Is-A-Poet
  •  Jehovah-Mekoddishkem (Lev. 20:8)            The-Lord-Who-Sanctifies-You
  •  Qanna (Ex. 34:14)                                             Jealous
  •  Jehovah-Baal (Is. 54:5)                                   The-Lord-Your-Husband
  •  Jehovah-Derek (Judg. 18:6)                          The-Lord-Your-Way
  • Jehovah-Zimrath (Ex. 15:2)                            The-Lord-My-Song
  • Jehovah-Nasa (Ps. 99:8)                                 The-Lord-Who-Forgives
  • El Roi (Gen. 16:13)                                            The-God-Who-Sees

“Therefore God also has highly exalted Him and given Him the name which is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, and of those on earth, and of those under the earth” (Phil. 2:9-10).

“‘You shall not take the name of the LORD your God in vain: for the LORD will not hold him guiltless who takes his name in vain” (Deut. 5:11).

This week’s LOVE exercise (interactive scripture meditation, or lectio divina) is based on an Augustinian* personality approach. Go on! Try it!

Listen (Lectio)

As you read through the words of the following verse, imagine Jesus saying these words directly to you.

“Whatever you ask in my name, I will do it, that the Father may be glorified in the Son; If you ask anything in my name, I will do it” (Joh 14:13-14).

Observe (Meditatio)

Read this verse again, emphasizing each word in turn, like this:

“Whatever you ask in my name, I will do it, that the Father may be glorified in the Son; If you ask anything in my name, I will do it” (Joh 14:13-14).

“Whatever you ask in my name, I will do it, that the Father may be glorified in the Son; If you ask anything in my name, I will do it” (Joh 14:13-14).

“Whatever you ask in my name, I will do it, that the Father may be glorified in the Son; If you ask anything in my name, I will do it” (Joh 14:13-14).

“Whatever you ask in my name, I will do it, that the Father may be glorified in the Son; If you ask anything in my name, I will do it” (Joh 14:13-14).

“Whatever you ask in my name, I will do it, that the Father may be glorified in the Son; If you ask anything in my name, I will do it” (Joh 14:13-14).

“Whatever you ask in my name, I will do it, that the Father may be glorified in the Son; If you ask anything in my name, I will do it” (Joh 14:13-14).

Emphasize each word in turn until you have stressed the all. What do you notice?

Verbalize (Oratio)

What does a concentration on every one of Jesus’ words, here, tell you personally? What does Jesus want you to know? What does He want you to do now?

Tell Him, now, what’s on your heart.

Entrust (Contemplatio)

Perhaps you’d like to take a few minutes to simply wonder in this extraordinary promise and entrust yourself to Him anew.

.

*Interactive scripture meditations, LOVE Exercises, vary weekly according to the four personalities, or “prayer forms,” explored in Prayer and Temperament, by Chester Michael and Marie Norrisey: Ignatian, Augustinian, Franciscan, and Thomistic.

 

 For more resources and Sonja’s scripture meditation exercise for this episode visit  the Bible Study Evangelista website  

Sonja’s books can found here

Sonja Corbitt is the Bible Study Evangelista. She’s a Catholic Scripture teacher with a story teller’s gift – a Southern Belle with a warrior’s heart and a poet’s pen.

We’re all sweating and dirty with the effort to love and lift all He’s given to us – those people, duties, callings, and longings that break our hearts and make them sing, sometimes at the same time. But most times, we need to be loved and lifted ourselves.

So her Bible study media are created with you in mind, bites of spinach that taste like cake, to help you make space in your busy heart and schedule for God to love and lift you all the way up into His great lap, where all you’ve been given is loved and lifted too.

SP#4 “The Suffering of Fear” – The School of Prayer – with Fr. Scott Traynor

Catholic Spiritual Formation - Catholic Spiritual Direction

Fr. Scott Traynor talks about the suffering of fear.  Thoughts, feelings, and desires all come into play in our understanding of  this topic.  Wherever there is fear there dwells an experience of pain and wounding, which perfect love desires to heal.  The love of God is the remedy and our prayer opens the door to healing and/or union with the One that loves perfectly.  Our response in not trusting that love and areas of unforgiveness can be a block to that healing.  How do we, in our united  prayer with God, overcome this obstacle?

Parish-School-of-PrayerIn Father Scott Traynor’s book, Blessed John Paul II’s memorable call to make of the parish a school of prayer takes on flesh and becomes concretely attainable. Those you read these faith-filled pages will find renewed desire to create such parishes and a clear road-map toward this goal.
–Father Timothy Gallagher, OMV

Father Scott Traynor received his STB from the Pontifical Gregorian University and his JCL from Catholic University of America. He has been an instructor and spiritual director for many of the programs at the Institute for Priestly Formation.
Father Traynor is a retreat master and spiritual director who has travelled the country as a speaker at various conferences, diocesan gatherings and national conferences.. He is especially sought after to present on the topics of prayer, discernment and priestly identity and mission.
He serves the Rector of the St. John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver Colorado.

A Reflection on St. Anthony of Padua by Msgr. John Esseff on his 89th Birthday

Today we celebrate not only the feast of St. Anthony of Padua but also the 89th birthday of Msgr. Esseff, who takes the time to reflect on his special relationship with this great saint.

 

Scripture:  Matthew 5:13-16

13 “You are the salt of the earth; but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything  except to be thrown out and trodden under foot by men. 14 You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hid. 15 Nor do men light a lamp and put it under a bushel, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. 16 Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.”

Ignatius Edition of the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright 2006, by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission

Msgr. John A. Esseff is a Roman Catholic priest in the Diocese of Scranton. He was ordained on May 30, 1953, by the late Bishop William J. Hafey, D.D. at St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton, PA. Msgr. Esseff served a retreat director and confessor to St. Teresa of Calcutta. He continues to offer direction and retreats for the sisters of the Missionaries of Charity around the world. Msgr. Esseff encountered St. Padre Pio, who would become a spiritual father to him. He has lived in areas around the world, serving in the Pontifical Missions, a Catholic organization established by St. Pope John Paul II to bring the Good News to the world especially to the poor. Msgr. Esseff assisted the founders of the Institute for Priestly Formation and serves as a spiritual director for the Institute. He continues to serve as a retreat leader and director to bishops, priests and sisters and seminarians and other religious leaders around the world.

DC33 St. Anthony of Padua – The Doctors of the Church: The Charism of Wisdom w/ Dr. Matthew Bunson


Dr. Matthew Bunson discusses the life, times and teachings of St. Anthony of Padua

  1. Born: August 15, 1195, Lisbon, PortugalMatthew-Bunson
  2. Died: June 13, 1231, Padua, Italy
  3. Buried: Basilica of Saint Anthony of Padua, Padua, Italy
  4. Parents: Vicente Martins , Teresa Pais Taveira
For more on St. Anthony of Padua and his teachings

From Vatican.va, an excerpt from the teachings oPope Benedict XVI 

From the General Audience on St. Anthony of Padua

With his outstanding gifts of intelligence, balance, apostolic zeal and, primarily, mystic fervour, Anthony contributed significantly to the development of Franciscan spirituality.St.-Anthony-of-Padua

In St Anthony’s teaching on prayer we perceive one of the specific traits of the Franciscan theology that he founded: namely the role assigned to divine love which enters into the sphere of the affections, of the will and of the heart, and which is also the source from which flows a spiritual knowledge that surpasses all other knowledge. In fact, it is in loving that we come to know.

Anthony writes further: “Charity is the soul of faith, it gives it life; without love, faith dies” (Sermones Dominicales et Festivi II, Messagero, Padua 1979, p. 37).

It is only the prayerful soul that can progress in spiritual life: this is the privileged object of St Anthony’s preaching. He is thoroughly familiar with the shortcomings of human nature, with our tendency to lapse into sin, which is why he continuously urges us to fight the inclination to avidity, pride and impurity; instead of practising the virtues of poverty and generosity, of humility and obedience, of chastity and of purity. At the beginning of the 13th century, in the context of the rebirth of the city and the flourishing of trade, the number of people who were insensitive to the needs of the poor increased. This is why on various occasions Anthony invites the faithful to think of the true riches, those of the heart, which make people good and merciful and permit them to lay up treasure in Heaven. “O rich people”, he urged them, “befriend… the poor, welcome them into your homes: it will subsequently be they who receive you in the eternal tabernacles in which is the beauty of peace, the confidence of security and the opulent tranquillity of eternal satiety” (ibid., p. 29).

Anthony, in the school of Francis, always put Christ at the centre of his life and thinking, of his action and of his preaching. This is another characteristic feature of Franciscan theology: Christocentrism. Franciscan theology willingly contemplates and invites others to contemplate the mysteries of the Lord’s humanity, the man Jesus, and in a special way the mystery of the Nativity: God who made himself a Child and gave himself into our hands, a mystery that gives rise to sentiments of love and gratitude for divine goodness.

For more visit Vatican.va

For more from Dr. Matthew Bunson check out his Discerning Hearts page

Dr. Matthew Bunson, Senior Fellow of the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology, is one of the United States’ leading authorities on the papacy and the Church.

His books include: The Encyclopedia of Catholic History; The Encyclopedia of Saints; Papal Wisdom; All Shall Be Well; Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire; and The Angelic Doctor: The Life and World of St. Thomas Aquinas; The Pope Encyclopedia; We Have a Pope! Benedict XVI, the first Catholic biography of the Holy Father in the English language; the Encyclopedia of U.S. Catholic History; Pope Francis. His also the editor of OSV’s “The Catholic Answer” magazine.

SP#3 “Prayer in the Heart of Suffering” – The School of Prayer – with Fr. Scott Traynor

SP#3 “Prayer in the Heart of Suffering” – The School of Prayer: Foundations for the New Evangelization

Catholic Spiritual Formation - Catholic Spiritual Direction

Fr. Scott Traynor talks about the darkness that can be found in our lives.  How can we experience the overwhelming love and mercy of God, even in our suffering?  How can we live out the teaching of St. Paul:

Philippians 4:4 Rejoice in the Lord always. I shall say it again: rejoice!
Parish-School-of-PrayerIn Father Scott Traynor’s book, Blessed John Paul II’s memorable call to make of the parish a school of prayer takes on flesh and becomes concretely attainable. Those you read these faith-filled pages will find renewed desire to create such parishes and a clear road-map toward this goal.
–Father Timothy Gallagher, OMV

Father Scott Traynor received his STB from the Pontifical Gregorian University and his JCL from Catholic University of America. He has been an instructor and spiritual director for many of the programs at the Institute for Priestly Formation.
Father Traynor is a retreat master and spiritual director who has travelled the country as a speaker at various conferences, diocesan gatherings and national conferences.. He is especially sought after to present on the topics of prayer, discernment and priestly identity and mission.
He serves the Rector of the St. John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver Colorado.

The Fifth Meditation – Introduction to the Devout Life: Chapter 13 by St. Francis de Sales audio mp3 edition

Catholic Devotional Prayers and Novenas - Mp3 Audio Downloads and Text 10

Introduction to the Devout Life
By
St. Francis de Sales

read by Omar F. A. Guiterrez

Chapter 13 – The Fifth Meditation:

For the pdf containing the complete text and footnotes click here

Other audio meditations from the Introduction to the Devout Life

Of Death.

Preparation.

1. PLACE yourself in the Presence of God.
2. Ask His Grace.
3. Suppose yourself to be on you death bed, in the last extremity, without the smallest hope of recovery.

Considerations.

1. Consider the uncertainty as to the day of your death. One day your soul will quit this body—will it be in summer or winter? in town or country? by day or by night? will it be suddenly or with warning? will it be owing to sickness or an accident? will you have time to make your last confession or not? will your confessor or spiritual father be at hand or will he not? Alas, of all these things we know absolutely nothing: all that we do know is that die we shall, and for the most part sooner than we expect.
2. Consider that then the world is at end as far as you are concerned, there will be no more of it for you, it will be altogether overthrown for you, since all pleasures, vanities, worldly joys, empty delights will be as a mere fantastic vision to you. Woe is me, for what mere trifles and unrealities I have ventured to offend my God? Then you will see that what we preferred to Him was nought. But, on the other hand, all devotion and good works will then seem so precious and so sweet:—Why did I not tread that pleasant path? Then what you thought to be little sins will look like huge mountains, and your devotion will seem but a very little thing.
3. Consider the universal farewell which your soul will take of this world. It will say farewell to riches, pleasures, and idle companions; to amusements and pastimes, to friends and neighbours, to husband, wife and child, in short to all creation. And lastly it will say farewell to its own body, which it will leave pale and cold, to become repulsive in decay.
4. Consider how the survivors will hasten to put that body away, and hide it beneath the earth—and then the world will scarce give you another thought, or remember you, any more than you have done to those already gone. “God rest his soul!” men will say, and that is all. O death, how pitiless, how hard thou art!
5. Consider that when it quits the body the soul must go at once to the right hand or the left. To which will your soul go? what side will it take? none other, be sure, than that to which it had voluntarily drawn while yet in this world.

Affections and Resolutions.

1. Pray to God, and throw yourself into His Arms. O Lord, be Thou my stay in that day of anguish! May that hour be blessed and favourable to me, if all the rest of my life be full of sadness and trial.
2. Despise the world. Forasmuch as I know not the hour in which I must quit the world, I will not grow fond of it. O dear friends, beloved ones of my heart, be content that I cleave to you only with a holy friendship which may last for ever; why should I cling to you with a tie which must needs be broken? I will prepare for the hour of death and take every precaution for its peaceful arrival; I will thoroughly examine into the state of my conscience, and put in order whatever is wanting.

Conclusion.

Thank God for inspiring you with these resolutions: offer them to His Majesty: intreat Him anew to grant you a happy death by the Merits of His Dear Son’s Death. Ask the prayers of the Blessed Virgin and the Saints.

OUR FATHER, etc.
Gather a bouquet of myrrh.

Pentecost “Come Holy Spirit” – Building a Kingdom of Love w/ Msgr. John Esseff

Msgr. Esseff reflects on the great gift of the Holy Spirit to the disciples 2000 years ago and what it means for us today!

Sequence — Veni, Sancte Spiritus

Come, Holy Spirit, come!
And from your celestial home
Shed a ray of light divine!

Come, Father of the poor!
Come, source of all our store!
Come, within our bosoms shine.

You, of comforters the best;
You, the soul’s most welcome guest;
Sweet refreshment here below;

In our labor, rest most sweet;
Grateful coolness in the heat;
Solace in the midst of woe.

O most blessed Light divine,
Shine within these hearts of yours,
And our inmost being fill!

Where you are not, we have naught,
Nothing good in deed or thought,
Nothing free from taint of ill.

Heal our wounds, our strength renew;
On our dryness pour your dew;
Wash the stains of guilt away:

Bend the stubborn heart and will;
Melt the frozen, warm the chill;
Guide the steps that go astray.

On the faithful, who adore
And confess you, evermore
In your sevenfold gift descend;

Give them virtue’s sure reward;
Give them your salvation, Lord;
Give them joys that never end. Amen.
Alleluia.

Msgr. John A. Esseff is a Roman Catholic priest in the Diocese of Scranton. He was ordained on May 30, 1953, by the late Bishop William J. Hafey, D.D. at St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton, PA. Msgr. Esseff served a retreat director and confessor to St. Teresa of Calcutta. He continues to offer direction and retreats for the sisters of the Missionaries of Charity around the world. Msgr. Esseff encountered St. Padre Pio, who would become a spiritual father to him. He has lived in areas around the world, serving in the Pontifical Missions, a Catholic organization established by St. Pope John Paul II to bring the Good News to the world especially to the poor. Msgr. Esseff assisted the founders of the Institute for Priestly Formation and serves as a spiritual director for the Institute. He continues to serve as a retreat leader and director to bishops, priests and sisters and seminarians and other religious leaders around t

 

USCCA9 – Receive the Holy Spirit – U. S. Catholic Catechism for Adults w/ Arch. George Lucas

Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 9:

The Holy Spirit is dynamic, transforming our bodies into temples of God and  our souls into dwelling places for Christ.  Sometimes called the Paraclete, a term that describes him as adovcate and consoler, the Holy Spirit wants to fill us with inspiration and encouragement

The Most Reverend George J. Lucas leads the Archdiocese of Omaha. 

For other episodes in the visit our Archbishop George Lucas page

This programs is based on:

 

More information can be found here.

We wish to thank the USCCB for the permissions granted for use of  relevant material used in this series.
Also we wish to thank Omar Gutierrez, Teresa Monaghen, and Bruce McGregor  for their vocal talents in this episode.

IP#316 Rod Dreher – The Benedict Option on Inside the Pages

We could not be more enthusiastic about bringing forward any book this year than we are with Rod Dreher’s ” The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation”!  Relying on the wisdom of St. Benedict of Nursia, Rod suggests that the answer to the moral chaos that has affected our culture is to embrace the principles of order, hospitality, stability, and prayer.  These core attributes can become solid foundations of all Chris­tians—Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox—and can transform our lives, families and the culture that surrounds us. “Neither false optimism nor fatalistic despair will do” as so well stated in the book description “Only faith, hope, and love, embodied in a renewed church, can sustain believers in the dark age that have overtaken us. These are the days for building strong arks for the long journey across a sea of night.”  Highly recommended!

 

You can find the book here

“A terrific book: provocative in its content, shrewd in its insights, vivid and engaging in its style. The strength of The Benedict Option is not just its analysis of our culture’s developing problems but its outline of practical ways Christians can survive and thrive in a dramatically different America. This is an invaluable tool for understanding our times and acting as faithful believers.”
—Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., Archbishop of Philadelphia