Episode 1 – In Defense of Sanity – Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J., Vivian Dudro, and Joseph Pearce FBC Podcast

Sometimes G.K. Chesterton goes too far—but here’s why. We begin our discussion of In Defense of Sanity, a book of essays by G.K. Chesterton.

This discussion is part of the FORMED Book Club—an online community led by Fr. Joseph Fessio, Joseph Pearce, and Vivian Dudro that reads and discusses a different book each month.


 

You can find the book here

G.K. Chesterton was a master essayist. But reading his essays is not just an exercise in studying a literary form at its finest, it is an encounter with timeless truths that jump off the page as fresh and powerful as the day they were written. The only problem with Chesterton’s essays is that there are too many of them. Over five thousand!

For most GKC readers it is not even possible to know where to start or how to begin to approach them.  So three of the world’s leading authorities on Chesterton – Dale Ahlquist, Joseph Pearce, Aidan Mackey – have joined together to select the best Chesterton essays, a collection that will be appreciated by both the newcomer and the seasoned student of this great 20th-century man of letters.

The variety of topics are astounding: barbarians, architects, mystics, ghosts, fireworks, rain, juries, gargoyles, and much more. Plus a look at Shakespeare, Dickens, Jane Austen, George MacDonald, T.S. Eliot, and the Bible. All in that inimitable, formidable but always quotable style of GKC. Even more astounding than the variety is the continuity of Chesterton’s thought that ties everything together.

A veritable feast for the mind and heart. While some of the essays in this volume may be familiar, many of them are collected here for the first time, making their first appearance in over a century.


Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J.
Vivian Dudro
Joseph Pearce

 

PSM3 – Living Mystery in the Mundane – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Dr. David Fagerberg

Episode 3 – Living Mystery in the Mundane  – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg Ph.D.

Dr. David Fagerberg and Kris McGregor discuss how “mundane” liturgical theology consecrates the world and sanctifies our daily life.

Here are some of the topics explored in this episode:

What is a “mundane” liturgical theology?

The call to holiness is here and now.

How the Church serves a Mother.

Why liturgy? Why worship? Why are we called?

 

From the discussion with Dr. Fagerberg:

So where are you going to practice your asceticism, not sitting in your office, reading a book and thinking lofty thoughts about the human race, but when that colleague bugs me in this office meeting, when one more time I have to admit that Elizabeth is right, but I’m too stubborn to do so overcoming those passions of pride and vainglory and ego and avarice and gluttony and, and envy and backbiting… tiny little actions, day by day, movement by movement.  St. John Chrysostom has a terrific homily on Ephesians which he says that the poor that you meet in the city, in the public square, the poor are another altar on which you can make your Eucharistic sacrifice. You’re so happy to have been in the church where there’s this stone altar that was, honored and revered because it bore upon it, the body and blood of Christ. Well, here is Christ in the person of the poor.  Look, how generous God is to you. He’s given you a thousand chances a day to make another liturgical act, another Eucharistic sacrifice. And just when I think I’ve satisfied my quarter, he sends another one to me, what a good and generous God we have.

More taken from the discussion:

Chesterton was asked why he became a Catholic. And his answer was because we’re sinners. And because we have a God who loves us passionately. And so this is what God has done in order to rectify the problem. I think God always had intended to bring us home to him, to let us join the life of God, to enter the perichoresis of the Trinity. It’s not like that was plan A and then after the fall in the garden of Eden, he moved on to plan B redemption is a completion of creation. Creation was the beginning of redemption. So his goal is for our sanctification, our adoption, our deification, and God gets the ball rolling with the salvation history.

David W. Fagerberg is Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He holds masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St. John’s University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and Yale University. His Ph.D. is from Yale University in liturgical theology.


For more podcast episodes of this series visit the
Pathways to Sacred Mysteries w/Dr. David Fagerberg page


David W. Fagerberg is Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He holds masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St. John’s University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and Yale University. His Ph.D. is from Yale University in liturgical theology.

Fagerberg’s work has explored how the Church’s lex credendi (law of belief) is founded upon the Church’s lex orandi (law of prayer). This was expressed in Theologia Prima (Hillenbrand Books, 2003). He has integrated into this the Eastern Orthodox understanding of asceticism by considering its role in preparing the liturgical person. This was treated in On Liturgical Asceticism (Catholic University Press, 2013). And these two themes come together in Consecrating the World: On Mundane Liturgical Theology (Angelico Press, 2016).

He also has an avocation in G. K. Chesterton, having published Chesterton is Everywhere (Emmaus Press, 2013) and The Size of Chesterton’s Catholicism (University of Notre Dame, 1998).

 


Here are a few of Dr. Fagerberg’s books:
Liturgical Theology Liturgical Mysticism Liturgical Theology Theological Theology

Ep 3 – Responding to the Call – And Mary’s ‘Yes’ Continues Afresh w/ Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Episode 3 of 4 of And Mary’s ‘Yes’ Continues Afresh with Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz one of the founders and the vocation director of the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist

Join Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz and Kris McGregor as they discuss:

1. Responding to the Call
2. How is God Present?
3. The Need for More Teachers
4. Give God Permission
5. Letting Go of the Baggage

Visit here to pick up a copy of the book

From the book description:

Our world is constantly changing and each generation faces new challenges of faith and identity. In this increasingly post-Christian, radically secular culture, the vocation of a consecrated religious might appear outdated or, perhaps, wasteful. Even within the Church, the vocation of a Bride of Christ is a mystery to many who have never encountered it. But who is a religious Sister? She is one who hears our Lord’s call to “Come, follow me!” and answers with the resounding confidence of Mary’s Fiat! She is exactly what our world needs: a light in the darkness, a soul dedicated completely to loving and serving God and her neighbor.

In this new volume, And Mary’s Yes Continues Afresh, the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist present a treasure-trove of education and inspiration for young women, parents, priests, and educators alike. You’ll learn what religious life is all about; hear the inspiring vocation stories of women from all walks of life and many different nationalities; and discover—perhaps for the first time—the incredible gift of the consecrated life. You might even hear the Lord’s call in your own heart. Ultimately, you will come away with a deeper understanding and appreciation of the life-giving vocation of religious Sisters, and their role in our world today.


The Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist

The Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist, were canonically established in 1997 in response to Pope St. John Paul II’s call for a New Evangelization. We seek to share God’s message of faith and the joy of religious life with the modern world through various outreaches including education, vocations, and culture.
Read more about their charism

Beginning with four foundresses, their community has now grown to over 150 Sisters with an average age of 32. Their Motherhouse is located in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Their website can be found at sistersofmary.org

IP#376 Kimberly Hahn – Grace and Gifted on Inside the Pages with Kris McGregor – Discerning Hearts Podcast


What a delight to be joined by Kimberly Hahn to discuss Grace and Gifted: Biblical Wisdom for the Homemaker’s Heart!  With Kimberly, we continue our journey through the wisdom found in Proverbs 31.  This time we explore the joy of creating a home for our loved ones fueled by the grace found in the sacraments.

Kimberly is also the host of the Beloved and Blessed podcast.  Her voice is a much-needed source of grace in this ever-expanding media platform.  You can check it out at the link found below.  We encourage you to subscribe!

You can find the book here

From the book description

As wives and mothers, we know that the home is the sacred space in which we live out our vocations. But many of us struggle to manage the various aspects of homemaking.

Graced and Gifted: Biblical Wisdom for the Homemaker’s Heart draws from Proverbs 31 to give women indispensable wisdom on caring for our homes and families. In this six-part Bible study, learn

  • Tips for time management
  • How to create a pleasant environment
  • The secrets of food preparation
  • The importance of making meals a time of communion
  • How to cultivate a garden
  • And why each of the sacraments relate to homemaking

Grace and Gifted is an inspiring Bible study, perfect for personal or group use, that will help you discover the noble virtues that every wife needs.

Be sure to also check out Kimberly’s Beloved and Blessed Podcast!  You can find it by visiting:  BelovedandBlessed.com

Episode 6 – Real Philosophy for Real People – Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J., Vivian Dudro, and Joseph Pearce FBC Podcast

Would you fill a sacred chalice with coffee? Why or why not? Sex, the sacredness of the human body, and more as we finish our discussion of chapter 5 of Real Philosophy for Real People by Robert McTeigue, S.J.

This discussion is part of the FORMED Book Club—an online community led by Fr. Joseph Fessio, Joseph Pearce, and Vivian Dudro that reads and discusses a different book each month.


You can find the book here

A great philosopher once observed, “Philosophers let theories get in the way of what they and everybody else know.” A lot of ink has been spilt in order to obscure what we really can’t not know about reality, humanity and morality.

In the midst of a culture permeated by philosophies that seek to redefine the universally available meaning of what it is to be human, Fr. Robert McTeigue says it is more important than ever to be equipped with reliable philosophical tools that help us to see clearly the implications of our stated moral claims; that enable us to detect moral and logical error; and that keep us grounded in the love of truth.

You will find such tools in these pages that explore what it means to be human with metaphysical, anthropological, and ethical dimensions.

But this book does more than offer tools for seeing and understanding. It is a refutation of philosophies which prize love of theory over love of truth; a rebuke of any metaphysics that cannot account for itself; a refutation of anthropologies which are unworthy of the human person; and a refutation of ethical systems which reduce the great dignity and destiny of the human person.

Most importantly, this book is a prescription for an alternative: it is a real philosophy for real people, wherein the best of classical philosophy finds its fulfillment, expressed in a contemporary idiom that is accessible to the layman and plausible to the scholar. It offers a catalog of errors with their refutations, and a map for living a truly human life. It is a portable error-detector, while providing a basis for knowing and presenting the truth.


Fr. Joseph Fessio S.J.
Vivian Dudro
Joseph Pearce

 

PSM2 – Liturgy as the Mystical Encounter – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Dr. David Fagerberg

Episode 2 – Liturgy as the Mystical Encounter  – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg Ph.D.

Dr. David Fagerberg and Kris McGregor discuss liturgy as the mystical encounter with our spouse, with our bridegroom Christ

Here are some of the topics explored in this episode:

What melody is this liturgy supposed to be creating?

What is Liturgical Asceticism?

The influence of the Desert Fathers and St. Benedict of Nursia.

Who’s liturgy should we be doing on Sunday morning?

Whose liturgy should we be doing in our lives?

From the discussion with Dr. Fagerberg:

There’s an ascetical effort and the mystical takes flight. I’ve seen pictures of birds that take lots and lots of steps. Oh, I’ve seen them take off from water. We might as well go back to baptismal imagery. Here’s the bird running along the surface of the waterfall. He’s flapping his wings and then takes off. the feet are the asceticism and the wings are mysticism.

 

More taken from the discussion:

The mystery of Christ, it sounds like the faithful are enabled to be mystics. So the definition finally arrives in 10 69. The word liturgy originally meant a public work, a service in the name of, or on behalf of the people. This was a Schmiemann phrase. The liturgy is the work of a few on behalf of the many. In ancient Rome, paying your taxes was called the liturgy. This was what you did for the sake of the public polis space. When the rich, sponsored a civic improvement project and made new roads, or when they sponsored a series of games in the Coliseum, not killing Christians, I presume, but chariot races, this was called their liturgy. It’s their contribution for the good of the city. Someone is doing a work to benefit others.

That’s the definition of the word liturgy. According to Catechism 10.69, which continues in Christian tradition, it means participation of the people of God in the work of God, the work of a few on behalf of the many, in this case, the work of three, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit on behalf of the human race, which stands cut off from God, alienated in death. The Father’s will is to destroy death and raise us to return a life through the Son and the Holy Spirit. And the work of salvation has unfolded from the bossom of the Father. So through liturgy Christ, our Redeemer and high priest continues the work of our redemption in, with, and through his liturgy. Through the liturgy, Christ continues his work of redemption. So who’s liturgy should we be doing on Sunday morning? Not mine, not yours. Christ’s work of redemption should be continued.  Christ. When I meet my neighbor, I must be via Christ to him. She must be a Christ to me. This expands beyond the 50 minutes and the mystery, which Christ enacted by his passion, this pasta is a mystery that takes us up into it. And that’s why we’re mystics.

 


For more podcast episodes of this series visit the
Pathways to Sacred Mysteries w/Dr. David Fagerberg page


David W. Fagerberg is Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He holds masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St. John’s University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and Yale University. His Ph.D. is from Yale University in liturgical theology.

Fagerberg’s work has explored how the Church’s lex credendi (law of belief) is founded upon the Church’s lex orandi (law of prayer). This was expressed in Theologia Prima (Hillenbrand Books, 2003). He has integrated into this the Eastern Orthodox understanding of asceticism by considering its role in preparing the liturgical person. This was treated in On Liturgical Asceticism (Catholic University Press, 2013). And these two themes come together in Consecrating the World: On Mundane Liturgical Theology (Angelico Press, 2016).

He also has an avocation in G. K. Chesterton, having published Chesterton is Everywhere (Emmaus Press, 2013) and The Size of Chesterton’s Catholicism (University of Notre Dame, 1998).

 


Here are a few of Dr. Fagerberg’s books:
Liturgical Theology Liturgical Mysticism Liturgical Theology Theological Theology

Ep 2 – The Call to Teach – And Mary’s ‘Yes’ Continues Afresh w/ Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Episode 2 of 4 of And Mary’s ‘Yes’ Continues Afresh with Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz one of the founders and the vocation director of the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist

Join Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz and Kris McGregor as they discuss:
1. The Maternal Nurturer
2. Where Are The Women?
3. The Call to Teach
4. The Presence of a Sister
5. The Importance of Grandparents

Visit here to pick up a copy of the book

From the book description:

Our world is constantly changing and each generation faces new challenges of faith and identity. In this increasingly post-Christian, radically secular culture, the vocation of a consecrated religious might appear outdated or, perhaps, wasteful. Even within the Church, the vocation of a Bride of Christ is a mystery to many who have never encountered it. But who is a religious Sister? She is one who hears our Lord’s call to “Come, follow me!” and answers with the resounding confidence of Mary’s Fiat! She is exactly what our world needs: a light in the darkness, a soul dedicated completely to loving and serving God and her neighbor.

In this new volume, And Mary’s Yes Continues Afresh, the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist present a treasure-trove of education and inspiration for young women, parents, priests, and educators alike. You’ll learn what religious life is all about; hear the inspiring vocation stories of women from all walks of life and many different nationalities; and discover—perhaps for the first time—the incredible gift of the consecrated life. You might even hear the Lord’s call in your own heart. Ultimately, you will come away with a deeper understanding and appreciation of the life-giving vocation of religious Sisters, and their role in our world today.


The Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist

The Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist, were canonically established in 1997 in response to Pope St. John Paul II’s call for a New Evangelization. We seek to share God’s message of faith and the joy of religious life with the modern world through various outreaches including education, vocations, and culture.
Read more about their charism

Beginning with four foundresses, their community has now grown to over 150 Sisters with an average age of 32. Their Motherhouse is located in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Their website can be found at sistersofmary.org

PSM1 – The River of Liturgy – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Dr. David Fagerberg

Episode 1 – The River of the Liturgy – Pathway to Sacred Mysteries with Dr. David Fagerberg Ph.D.

Dr. David Fagerberg and Kris McGregor begin this 16 episode series that explores various aspects of Liturgical Theology.

Here are some of the topics explored in this episode:

What is “liturgy”?

What is “mysticism”?

The significance of baptism.

Understanding “teleology”. What’s the telos of a human being?

Understanding the connection between the interior heart personal liturgy and the exterior sacramental public liturgy

From the discussion with Dr. Fagerberg:

“… everything was directed towards a certain end, there was a telos, teleology. The telos of our watches is to tell time, the telos of a knife is to cut. What’s the telos of a human being?  Deification, adoption, being taken up into the circulation of the life of the Trinity. How do you make that journey? That’s liturgical. That’s the ascetical struggle. That’s the discipline of spiritual warfare. That’s mysticism. That’s the allure theological in the way the Eastern fathers defined telógia, a union with God. The objective here is union with God. Well, if that’s the telos, the teleological end is our union with God, then everything, not just Sunday morning for 55 minutes, everything in our life and all aspects of our life, liturgical, theological, ascetical, and mystical.”

More taken from the discussion:

“There’s a book on liturgy by an Eastern Rite. Catholic named John Carbone, who takes the imagery from the book of revelation of liturgy as a river flowing from the throne of God. Oh, it’s not like, something that I’m trying to produce. Liturgy isn’t my production. Liturgy is the river of life flowing from the throne of God. And I imagined it landing first in the church in order to make this Mystical Body of Christ. It lands first in the baptismal font, but the font fills up and the river of liturgy overflows the lip of the baptismal font and it hits us.

And now it becomes our personal liturgy. Besides the public Church liturgy, there’s an interior heart personal liturgy. And I thought that’s liturgical mysticism. That’s liturgy happening at an interior mystical spiritual level. That’s an attempt to connect liturgical mysticism with the work of the Church. I surely am not suggesting that there are two tracks and some people like Church and priests and a lot of incense, and other people like to go in their room and pray by themselves. No, no, no. The interior heart personal liturgy must be connected to the exterior sacramental public liturgy.”


For more podcast episodes of this series visit the
Pathways to Sacred Mysteries w/Dr. David Fagerberg page


David W. Fagerberg is Professor in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He holds masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St. John’s University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and Yale University. His Ph.D. is from Yale University in liturgical theology.

Fagerberg’s work has explored how the Church’s lex credendi (law of belief) is founded upon the Church’s lex orandi (law of prayer). This was expressed in Theologia Prima (Hillenbrand Books, 2003). He has integrated into this the Eastern Orthodox understanding of asceticism by considering its role in preparing the liturgical person. This was treated in On Liturgical Asceticism (Catholic University Press, 2013). And these two themes come together in Consecrating the World: On Mundane Liturgical Theology (Angelico Press, 2016).

He also has an avocation in G. K. Chesterton, having published Chesterton is Everywhere (Emmaus Press, 2013) and The Size of Chesterton’s Catholicism (University of Notre Dame, 1998).

 


Here are a few of Dr. Fagerberg’s books:
Liturgical Theology Liturgical Mysticism Liturgical Theology Theological Theology

CWC8 – The Wellsprings of Prayer – Communion with Christ with Deacon James Keating – Discerning Hearts Podcast

Episode 8 – Communion with Christ – Practical Prayer – The “wellsprings”  where Christ awaits us.  Responding at the moment when the subtle interior movements of the Holy Spirit calls to us.  The Word of God becomes a place of encounter. The danger of  Scripture becoming all academic. People are converted when the Word approaches them as living.  The liturgy is also a place of encounter.  The heart is an “altar” in the liturgy.

Deacon James Keating, Ph.D., is a professor of Spiritual Theology and serves as a spiritual director at Kenrick Glennon Seminary in St. Louis, MO. 

Check out Deacon Keating’s “Discerning Heart” page

Deacon Keating is also the author of:


You can find the book here.

From the book description:

The book addresses their mutual dedication to remain with Christ in prayer even in the service of parishioners. Once prayer finds a place in the heart, compassion grows for those who look for God “like sheep without a shepherd.” Through interior prayerfulness, clerical unity in ministry can be better ensured Remain in Me is for priests and deacons to use as prayer, on retreat, or during the holy seasons of Lent and Advent.

 

 

Ep 1 – The Gift of Self – And Mary’s ‘Yes’ Continues Afresh w/ Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz – Discerning Hearts Podcast


Episode 1 of 4 of And Mary’s ‘Yes’ Continues Afresh with Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz one of the founders and the vocation director of the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist

Join Sr. Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz and Kris McGregor as they discuss the founding and charism of the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist.  We discuss:

  1. The need for the Eucharist and how to foster a deeper relationship with God in prayer.
  2. The Nurturing of “presence”
  3. The role of Mary of bringing us to her son in the Eucharist.
  4. The spousal receptivity and the sharing of maternal love the God’s children.
  5. The beauty of community life…in religious life and in the family
  6. The gift of self

Visit here to pick up a copy of the book

From the book description:

Our world is constantly changing and each generation faces new challenges of faith and identity. In this increasingly post-Christian, radically secular culture, the vocation of a consecrated religious might appear outdated or, perhaps, wasteful. Even within the Church, the vocation of a Bride of Christ is a mystery to many who have never encountered it. But who is a religious Sister? She is one who hears our Lord’s call to “Come, follow me!” and answers with the resounding confidence of Mary’s Fiat! She is exactly what our world needs: a light in the darkness, a soul dedicated completely to loving and serving God and her neighbor.

In this new volume, And Mary’s Yes Continues Afresh, the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist present a treasure-trove of education and inspiration for young women, parents, priests, and educators alike. You’ll learn what religious life is all about; hear the inspiring vocation stories of women from all walks of life and many different nationalities; and discover—perhaps for the first time—the incredible gift of the consecrated life. You might even hear the Lord’s call in your own heart. Ultimately, you will come away with a deeper understanding and appreciation of the life-giving vocation of religious Sisters, and their role in our world today.


The Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist

The Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist, were canonically established in 1997 in response to Pope St. John Paul II’s call for a New Evangelization. We seek to share God’s message of faith and the joy of religious life with the modern world through various outreaches including education, vocations, and culture.
Read more about their charism

Beginning with four foundresses, their community has now grown to over 150 Sisters with an average age of 32. Their Motherhouse is located in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Their website can be found at sistersofmary.org