Archbishop George J. Lucas & The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults

Archbisop George Lucas1 Archbishop George J. Lucas & The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults

USCCA1 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. Episode 1- My Soul Longs For You, O God

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 1:

How is our quest for God awakened? God first pursues us; this spurs us to search for him for whom we were made. the Catechism presents three paths through which every person can come to God; creation, the human person, and Revelation. In the next chapter, Revelation will be presented as the greatest and most essential path to God. He is discovered also through creation and through the mystery of our inner life.

USCCA2 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 2 God Comes to Meet Us

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 2:

Through the use of reason, we can learn much about God from both creation and conscience, but Revelation enables us to learn about God’s inner life and his loving plan to save us from sin and share in his divine life. No amount of unaided thinking could penetrate such a mystery. God freely chose to share this hidden mystery with us . God’s sharing was an act of friendship for us, revealing himself as one reveals his or her heart to a friend. Love does such things.

USCCA3 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 3 Proclaim the Gospel to Every Creature

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 3:

Blessed John XXIII and the Second Vatican Council itself illustrate how the Church constantly draws upon Tradition and Sacred Scripture. This chapter examines these foundations of the Church teaching because its through Tradition and Scripture that the Church knows God’s Revelation and transmits it from one generation to another.

USCCA4 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 4 Bring About the Obedience of Faith

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USCCA4- Episode 4- Bring About the Obedience of Faith

Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 4:

God makes himself known to us through Revelation in order both to give us something and to draw a response from us. Both this gift of God and our response to his Revelation are called faith. By faith, we are able to give our minds and hearts to God, to trust in his will, and to follow the direction he gives us.

USCCA5 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 5 I Believe in God

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USCCA5- Episode 5- I Believe in God

Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 5:

Revelation tells us that he living and personal, and profoundly close to us in creating and sustaining us. Though he is totally other, hidden, glorious, and wondrous, he communicates to us through creation us and reveals himself to us through the prophets and above in Jesus Christ, whom we meet in the Church, especially in Scripture and the Sacraments. In many ways, God speaks to our hearts where we may welcome his loving presence.

USCCA6 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 6 Man and Woman in the Beginning

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 6:

It is Jesus Christ who frees us from Original Sin and our own actual sins. By Baptism, we share in the redemptive act of Jesus’ death and Resurrection, are freed from Original Sin, and are strengthened against the power of sin and death. We are reconciled to God and made members of his holy people, the Church.

USCCA7 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 7 The Good News: God Has Sent His Son

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 7:

We ponder Christ’s person and his earthly words and deeds in terms of mystery. His earthly life reveals his hidden divine Sonship and plan for our salvation. His parables, miracles, sermons, and wisdom sayings help us “to see our God made visible, and so we are caught up in love of the God we cannot see” (First Preface for Christmas).

USCCA8 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 8 The Saving Death and Resurrection of Christ

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 8:

Because Christ’s suffering and death was the instruments of salvation, from what did he save us? We needed to be saved from sin and its damaging effects. God’s plan to save us involved having the Son of God enter into this world to be like us in all things except sin. Divine love made this possible.

USCCA9 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 9 Receive the Holy Spirit

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 9:

The Holy Spirit is dynamic, transforming our bodies into temples of God and our souls into dwelling places fro Christ. Sometimes called the Paraclete, a term that describes him as adovcate and consoler, the Holy Spirit wants to fill us with inspiration and encouragement

USCCA10 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 10 The Church: Reflecting the Light of Christ

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 10:

The Church is the continuing manifestation of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The Church exists by the will of God the Father and his plan to gather all people under the Lordship of his Son. As Head of the Church, Jesus Christ continues to fill her with his life and saving grace, pouring into her the Holy Spirit with his gifts of unity, peace, and love.

USCCA11 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 11 The Four Marks of the Church

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 11:

“In the earliest professions of faith, the Catholic Church identified herself as “one, holy, catholic, and apostolic.” We find these words in the Nicene Creed professed at Sunday Mass. Traditionally, they refer to what are known as the four marks of the Church, traits that identify the Church before the world.”

USCCA12 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 12 Mary: The Church’s First and Most Perfect Member

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 12:

The Second Vatican Council remains us that Mary is a member of the Church who “occupies a place in the Church which is the highest after Christ and also closest to us” (LG, no. 54). She is the first and the greatest of all the disciples of Christ

USCCA13 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 13 Our Eternal Destiny

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 13:

” But the reality of death and its finality give an urgency to our lives. “Death puts an end to human life as the time open to either accepting or rejecting the divine grace manifested in Christ” (CCC, no. 1021). This teaching recognizes that the death of a person marks an end to our earthly journey with its sorrows and joys, its sinful failures, and the triumphs of Christ’s saving grace and help.

USCCA14 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 14 The Celebration of the Paschal Mystery of Christ

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 14:

Through the liturgical celebrations of the Church, we participate in the Paschal Mystery of Christ, that is, his passing thrugh death from this life into eternal flory, just as God enabled the people of ancient Israel to pass from slavery to freedom through the events narrated int he Book of Exodus (cf. Ex 11-13). The liturgies of the Chruch also help to teach us about Jesus Christ and the meaning of the mysteries we are celebrating.

USCCA15 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 15 Baptism: Becoming a Christian

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As mentioned earlier in this chapter, the Lord himself affirms that Baptism is necessary for salvation. “No one can enter the Kingdom of God without being born of water and the Spirit” (Jn 3:5). Christ commanded his disciples to preach the Gospel, draw people to faith in him, and baptize those who come to conversion. The Church does not neglect the mission she has received form Christ to ensure that all be baptized and reborn of water and the Spirit.

USCCA16 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 16 Confirmation: Consecrated for Mission

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USCCA16- Episode 16- Confirmation: Consecrated for Mission

Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 16:

“When we are responsive to the grace of Confirmation and the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit, we begin to bear the fruits of the Spirit. The tradition of the Church names twelve frutis of the Holy Spirit: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, generosity, gentleness, faithfulness, modesty, self-control, and chastity”

The Most Reverend George J. Lucas leads the Archdiocese of Omaha.

USCCA17 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 17 Part 1 The Eucharist: Source and Summit of Christian Life

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 17 part 1:

The Church draws her life from the Eucharist. This truth does not simply express a daily experience of faith, but recapitulates the heart of the mystery of the Church. In a variety of ways, she joyfully experiences the constant fulfillment of the promise, “Lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age” (Mt 28:20), but in the Holy Eucharist, through the changing of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of the Lord, she rejoices in this presence with unique intensity. Ever since Pentecost, when the Church, the People of the New Covenant, began her pilgrim journey towards her heavenly homeland, the Divine Sacrament has continued to mark the passing of her days, filling them with confident hope.

(This will be a 2 part program on this chapter)

USCCA18 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 17 Part 2 The Eucharist: Source and Summit of Christian Life

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Chapter 17 part 2- The Eucharist: Source and Summit of Christian Life

Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 17:

The consecrated bread has become Christ’s Body. The consecrated wine has become Christ’s Blood. Jesus Christ is substantially present in a way that is entirely unique. This happens by the power of the Holy Spirit through the ministry of the priest’s or bishop’s acting in the person of Christ during the Eucharistic Prayer. At Mass, when we are offered the Host and hear the statement “The Body of Christ,” we answer, “Amen,” that is, “Yes, I believe.”

USCCA19 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 18 Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation – God is Rich in Mercy

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 18:

It is called the Sacrament of Conversion because it makes sacramentally present Jesus’ call to conversion, the first step in returning to the Father from whom one has strayed by sin. It is called the Sacrament of Penance, since it consecrates the Christian sinner’s personal and ecclesial steps of conversion, penance, and satisfaction. It is called the Sacrament of Confession since the disclosure or confession of sins is an essential element of this Sacrament. In a profound sense, it is also a called “confession” —acknowledgment and praise—of the holiness of God and of his mercy toward sinful man. It is called the Sacrament of Forgiveness, since by the priest’s sacramental absolution, God grants the penitent “pardon and peace.” It is called the Sacrament of Reconciliation because it imparts to the sinner the love of God who reconciles: “Be reconciled to God” (2 Cor 5:20). He who lives by God’s merciful love is ready to respond to the Lord’s call: “Go, first be reconciled to your brother.” (CCC, nos. 1423-1424, citing Mt 5:24)

USCCA20 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 19 Anointing of the Sick and the Dying

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter19:

When the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick is given, the hoped-for effect is that, if it be God’s will, the person be physically healed of illness. But even if there is no physical healing, the primary effect of the Sacrament is a spiritual healing by which the sick person receives the Holy Spirit’s gift of peace and courage to deal with the difficulties that accompany serious illness or the frailty of old age. The Holy Spirit renews our faith in God and helps us withstand the temptations of the Evil One to be discouraged and despairing in the face of suffering and death. Also, a sick person’s sins are forgiven if he or she was not able to go to Confession prior to the celebration of the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick.

USCCA21 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 20 Holy Orders Part 1

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Holy Orders Part 1

Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 20:

The Church adopted the term order from its use in the Roman Empire, where it referred to a governing group. In the Sacrament of Holy Orders, there are three degrees or “orders”: bishop, priest, and deacon. The rite of ordination is the sacramental act that makes this possible. Ordination “confers a gift of the Holy Spirit that permits the exercise of a ‘sacred power’ …which can come only from Christ himself through the Church” (CCC, no. 1538).

USCCA22 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 20 Holy Orders Part 2

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Chapter 20 Holy Orders Part 2

Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 20:

A bishop is given the grace to teach in the name of Christ; to sanctify the Church through the celebration of the Sacraments; to guide, govern, and defend the Church; and to be a sign of the unity of the Church.

A priest is given the grace to proclaim the Gospel and preach, to celebrate the Sacraments (except Holy Orders), and to shepherd the people entrusted to him.

A deacon in the Latin Church is ordained to proclaim the Gospel and preach, to baptize, to assist the bishop or priest in the celebration of the Eucharist, to assist at and bless marriages, to preside at funerals, and to serve the community through works of charity.

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB)

USCCA23 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 21 The Sacrament of Marriage Part 1

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter21:

The first effect of the Sacrament of Matrimony is the gift of the bond between the spouses. “The consent by which the spouses mutually give and receive one another is sealed by God himself” (CCC, no. 1639). “The marriage bond has been established by God himself in such a way that a marriage concluded and consummated between baptized persons can never be dissolved” (CCC, no. 1640).

USCCA24 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 21 The Sacrament of Marriage Part 2

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter21:

The couple needs to remember they have entered a relationship between persons. They come to one another with two loves, the one commanded by Jesus and the one caused by their attraction to each other. They are challenged to unite their personal love with Christ’s love. Their human love will survive more effectively the cultural challenges they face, as well as the psychological and economic ones, when it is merged with the powerful love of Christ, who wants them to succeed and whose divine grace is ever at their service

USCCA25 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 22 Sacramentals and Popular Devotions

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Sacramentals dispose believers to receive the chief effects of the Sacraments. They are sacred signs that resemble the Sacraments in the sense that they signify spiritual effects that are obtained through the intercession of the Church. Sacramentals include blessings, actions such as processions, prayers such as the Rosary, and objects such as holy water, palms, ashes, candles, and medals.

The Church instituted sacramentals to sanctify certain ministries, states of life, and the variety of situations in which Christians are involved. Their use has been guided by bishops’ pastoral decisions in responding to specific needs that are particular to a given period of history or locality. They include a prayer, usually with a gesture such as the Sign of the Cross or the sprinkling of holy water.

USCCA26 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 23 Life in Jesus part 1

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter23:

Made in the Image of God

The most basic principle of the Christian moral life is the awareness that every person bears the dignity of being made in the image of God. He has given us an immortal soul and through the gifts of intelligence and reason enables us to understand the order of things established in his creation. God has also given us a free will to seek and love what is true, good, and beautiful. Sadly, because of the Fall, we also suffer the impact of Original Sin, which darkens our minds, weakens our wills, and inclines us to sin. Baptism delivers us from Original Sin but not from its effects—especially the inclination to sin, concupiscence. Within us, then, is both the powerful surge toward the good because we are made in the image of God, and the darker impulses toward evil because of the effects of Original Sin. But we should always remember that Christ’s dying and rising offers us new life in the Spirit, whose saving grace delivers us from sin and heals sin’s damage within us. Thus we speak of the value, dignity, and goal of human life, even with its imperfections and struggles. Human life, as a profound unity of physical and spiritual dimensions, is sacred. It is distinct from all other forms of life, since it alone is imprinted with the very image of its Creator

USCCA27 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 23 Life in Jesus part 2

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter23:

The Understanding of Moral Acts Another important foundation of Christian morality is the understanding of moral acts. Every moral act consists of three elements: the objective act (what we do), the subjective goal or intention (why we do the act), and the concrete situation or circumstances in which we perform the act (where, when, how, with whom, the consequences, etc.). For an individual act to be morally good, the object, or what we are doing, must be objectively good. Some acts, apart from the intention or reason for doing them, are always wrong because they go against a fundamental or basic human good that ought never to be compromised. Direct killing of the innocent, torture, and rape are examples of acts that are always wrong. Such acts are referred to as intrinsically evil acts, meaning that they are wrong in themselves, apart from the reason they are done or the circumstances surrounding them. The goal, end, or intention is the part of the moral act that lies within the person. For this reason, we say that the intention is the subjective element of the moral act. For an act to be morally good, one’s intention must be good. If we are motivated to do something by a bad intention—even something that is objectively good—our action is morally evil. It must also be recognized that a good intention cannot make a bad action (something intrinsically evil) good. We can never do something wrong or evil in order to bring about a good. This is the meaning of the saying, “the end does not justify the means” (cf. CCC, nos. 1749-1761).

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB)

USCCA28 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 23 Life in Jesus part 3

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 23:

Conscience represents both the more general ability we have as human beings to know what is good and right and the concrete judgments we make in particular situations concerning what we should do or about what we have already done. Moral choices confront us with the decision to follow or depart from reason and the divine law. A good conscience makes judgments that conform to reason and the good that is willed by the Wisdom of God. A good conscience requires lifelong formation. Each baptized follower of Christ is obliged to form his or her conscience according to objective moral standards. The Word of God is a principal tool in the formation of conscience when it is assimilated by study, prayer, and practice. The prudent advice and good example of others support and enlighten our conscience. The authoritative teaching of the Church is an essential element in our conscience formation. Finally, the gifts of the Holy Spirit, combined with regular examination of our conscience, will help us develop a morally sensitive conscience.

USCCA29 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 23 Life in Jesus part 4

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 23:

Conscience represents both the more general ability we have as human beings to know what is good and right and the concrete judgments we make in particular situations concerning what we should do or about what we have already done. Moral choices confront us with the decision to follow or depart from reason and the divine law. A good conscience makes judgments that conform to reason and the good that is willed by the Wisdom of God. A good conscience requires lifelong formation. Each baptized follower of Christ is obliged to form his or her conscience according to objective moral standards. The Word of God is a principal tool in the formation of conscience when it is assimilated by study, prayer, and practice. The prudent advice and good example of others support and enlighten our conscience. The authoritative teaching of the Church is an essential element in our conscience formation. Finally, the gifts of the Holy Spirit, combined with regular examination of our conscience, will help us develop a morally sensitive conscience.

USCCA30 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 24 Life in Jesus

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 24:

An awareness of the social dimension of human life is an important principle in understanding Christian morality, especially in light of the great emphasis on individualism in our society. The social aspect of what it means to be human is revealed in the natural inclination we have to seek social interaction and establish community. This awareness serves as a moral foundation for an attitude of solidarity with each other and leads to a dedication to social justice for everyone. Our Gospel commitment to Christ’s Kingdom of love, justice, and mercy always includes advocating and supporting fairness for all. God calls us to form community and to correct both the symptoms and causes of injustice that rip apart the solidarity of a community.

USCCA31 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 25 The First Commandment: Believe in the True God

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 25:

The first three Commandments treat our relationship to God. The last seven concern our relationship with each other. The First Commandment calls us to have faith in the true God, to hope in him, and to love him fully with mind, heart, and will. We respond to God, who has created and redeemed us and extends his providential care to us every minute of each day. The First Commandment fosters the virtue of religion that moves us to adore God alone because he alone is holy and worthy of our praise.

USCCA32 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 26 The Second Commandment: Reverence God’s Name

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 26:

The Second Commandment forbids the wrong use or misuse of God’s name. There are a number of ways in which this happens. Blasphemy uses the name of God and of Jesus Christ as well as those of the Blessed Mother and the saints in an offensive manner. The Catechism teaches that blasphemy consists “in uttering against God—inwardly or outwardly—words of hatred, reproach, or defiance” (CCC, no. 2148). This is gravely sinful. Habitual disrespect for God, displayed in cursing and even in the use of vulgar language, can create an attitude that erodes our relationship with the Lord.

At the same time, we recognize diminished culpability when the name of God is used because of an outburst of undisciplined speech due to passion or unexpected incitement to anger. We need to cultivate a persistent reverence for sacred names; if we do not, we can end up giving bad example and also fall into the sin of blasphemy. It should also be noted that in Scripture, the sometimes passionate language of the Prophets, in which they lament the troubles of their times and utter loud complaints to God, is not blasphemy or the taking of God’s name in vain. It is actually prayer addressed to God.

The Sacrament of Penance with Archbishop George Lucas episode 1

Archbishop Lucas begins a video series on the Sacrament of Penance

Be sure to check out more from the Archbishop on this sacrament at USCCA19 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 18 Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation – God is Rich in Mercy

How to prepare for the Sacrament of Penance with Archbishop Lucas episode 2

Archbishop Lucas begins a video series on the Sacrament of Penance

Be sure to check out more from the Archbishop on this sacrament at USCCA19 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 18 Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation – God is Rich in Mercy

The Ritual for The Sacrament of Penance with Archbishop George Lucas episode 3

Archbishop Lucas begins a video series on the Sacrament of Penance

Be sure to check out more from the Archbishop on this sacrament at USCCA19 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 18 Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation – God is Rich in Mercy

USCCA33 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 27 The Third Commandment: Love the Lord’s Day

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 27:

The Catechism starts its reflection on the Third Commandment with the scriptural meaning of the Sabbath. Exodus 20:8-11 states that the Sabbath was the seventh day on which the Lord rested after the work of the previous six days. Deuteronomy 5:12 adds that the Sabbath is a day of our renewing the covenant with God. The Sabbath is connected to creation and covenant.

God’s “rest” on the seventh day was his contemplative gaze enjoying the good of creation, especially its crown in man and woman. It was not a matter of divine inactivity, but rather the deeper “work” of contemplation and the restful act of loving us (cf. CCC, nos. 2184-2185). This is true also of ourselves. If we never stop working, when would we ever have time to contemplate and worship God and nourish a love relationship with him or with anyone else? Every human person, having been created by God, owes him worship and thanksgiving for what the Lord has done and continues to do.

USCCA34 – The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 28 The Fourth Commandment: Strengthen Your Family

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 28:

The Fourth Commandment deals with all aspects of family life—parental and filial duties and responsibilities, that is, those of love from child to parent. This includes the duties of children toward their parents, the duties of brothers and sisters toward each other, and the responsibilities of adult children toward their older parents. This Commandment also addresses the duties of government and the duties of citizens (cf. CCC, nos. 2234-2246), including the responsibility of the state and society to foster family values and to strengthen the family in every possible way.

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB)

USCCA35 – The Fifth Commandment: Promote the Culture of Life part 1 -The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 29

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USCCA35 Chapter 29 part 1

Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 29:

Modern technology has enabled us to appreciate how quickly the growing child in the womb takes on human features. This has made many more people aware of the fact that human life begins at conception, the moment that the egg is fertilized. Many common forms of artificial birth control cause abortions by not allowing the newly conceived human child to implant in the mother’s womb. The pro-life commitment of the Church is reflected in her compassion for those who so often regret having had an abortion, her understanding for those who are facing difficult decisions, and her assistance for all who choose life. People who have been involved with an abortion are encouraged to get in touch with the Project Rachel ministry and other ministries that enable them to seek the mercy of God in the Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation and to obtain the necessary counseling. Pro-life ministries work with expectant mothers who are considering abortion by encouraging them to choose life for their children. They also provide alternatives to abortion through prenatal care, assistance in raising children, and adoption placement services.

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) (2012-04-02). United States Catholic Catechism for Adults (Kindle Locations 5666-5674). United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). Kindle Edition.

USCCA36 – The Fifth Commandment: Promote the Culture of Life part 2-The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 29

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 29:

Intentional euthanasia, sometimes called mercy killing, is murder. Regardless of the motives or means, euthanasia consists of putting to death those who are sick, are disabled, or are dying. It is morally unacceptable. The emergence of physician-assisted suicide, popularized by the right-to-die movement, seeks to legalize what is an immoral act. Its advocates plan to achieve this on a state-by-state basis.

Suicide is gravely sinful whether committed alone or aided by a doctor. Serious psychological disturbances, anxiety, fear of suffering, or torture can diminish the responsibility of the one committing suicide. The question is often asked whether persons who have committed suicide receive eternal salvation. Although suicide is always objectively sinful, one “should not despair of the eternal salvation of persons who have taken their own lives. By ways known to him alone, God can provide the opportunity for salutary repentance. The Church prays for persons who have taken their own lives” (CCC, no. 2283). The pastoral care of family and friends of those who have taken their own lives is an important focus for the Church’s healing and compassionate ministry.

Catholic moral tradition has always taught that we can discontinue medical procedures that are burdensome, extraordinary, and disproportionate to the outcome. However, respect for every human being demands the ordinary treatment of the dying by the provision of food, water, warmth, and hygiene. Ordinary treatment is always a moral requirement.

There is also extraordinary treatment. The Church recognizes that some medical treatment may not provide benefits commensurate with the risks of certain medical procedures. Extraordinary medical treatment may not be morally required and can even cease in certain cases, depending on the benefits to the sick person and the burdens it will or may impose. For example, in instances when a person has been declared brain-dead, the patient can be disconnected from mechanical devices that sustain breathing and the heart since there is little hope of the person’s recovery.

USCCA37 – The Fifth Commandment: Promote the Culture of Life part 3-The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 29

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 29: on the death penalty and war.

USCCA38 – The 6th Commandment: Marital Fidelity part 1-The United States Catholic Catechism for Adults with Archbishop George Lucas – Chap. 30

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Archbishop Lucas offers insights on the US Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapter 30:

The Catechism states that sexuality involves the whole person. “Sexuality affects all aspects of the human person in the unity of his body and soul. It especially concerns affectivity, the capacity to love and to procreate, and in a more general way the aptitude for forming bonds of communion with others” (CCC, no. 2332).

The Sixth Commandment summons spouses to practice permanent and exclusive fidelity to one another. Emotional and sexual fidelity are essential to the commitment made in the marriage covenant. God established marriage as a reflection of his fidelity to us. The vows made by the spouses at their wedding to be faithful to one another forever should witness the very covenant God has made with us.

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